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The Rebranding Of SOPA: Now Called 'Notice And Staydown'

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posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 08:29 PM
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On Thursday morning, the House Judiciary Committee held its latest in a long series of hearings concerning potential copyright reform -- sometimes referred to as "the Next Great Copyright Act" after the Copyright Office kicked off the process with a talk on that topic (I'd quibble with the word "great" in there given how things are going so far).

-Continued, please check out the source,-

Professor Rebecca Tushnet did her usual amazing job of taking insanely detailed notes of both the speechifying section and the Q&A section. There's a lot to cover, so we're going to break it down into a few different posts.


The Rebranding Of SOPA: Now Called 'Notice And Staydown'

Well, here we go it's back under a different name. Most figured as much. Just giving the heads up. Second 512 of the DMCA - see here. Sources includes a live recording of the Committee on the Judiciary.



The whole goal of SOPA was to basically to shift the issue of copyright infringement to the tech industry from the MPAA/RIAA. The idea was that if you add liability to the tech players, then it would magically force the tech companies to figure out a way to "clean up" infringement (leaving aside all the collateral damage). That's the same thing with "notice and staydown." The real issue is trying to shift the liability burden to tech companies.



Continued...
Interesting, so what exactly will that mean?


Notice and staydown has nothing to do with actually stopping copyright infringement. It's about taking the burden off of the legacy players, easing the need for them to adapt and change, while trying to force big tech companies to pay up. The irony, of course, is that in the process it would harm much needed innovation from startups and entrepreneurs (the companies that the content creators really need the most) and lock in bigger, more powerful internet players.
- From the OP Source.

What do you say ATS?





posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 08:34 PM
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Hopefully the big internet players link arms again and tell um' to kiss their asses
edit on 14-3-2014 by introV because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 08:52 PM
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Bad ideas never die. They just get renamed and renumbered for the next Congress.

(sigh)



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 10:52 PM
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We all better enjoy the interweb while we got it...That'll be the first thing to go when SHTF, which could honestly be at any time.

Lots of wild stuff going on in the world and the HJC is still worrying about this?



posted on Mar, 15 2014 @ 01:15 PM
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If one ever needed evidence that our Representatives where not there to represent us, all one has to do is look at the public out cry against sopa and pipa, and yet they continue to push for it against the will of the people.



posted on Mar, 15 2014 @ 10:22 PM
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Updated, as in relation:
"U.S. aims to give up control over Internet administration"
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Mar, 15 2014 @ 10:46 PM
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introV
Hopefully the big internet players link arms again and tell um' to kiss their asses


Remember the great internet website blackout on January 18, 2012? Organizations such as Wikipedia, Google, Mozilla, Flickr, Reddit and others either shutdown or limited their content in protest against SOPA and PIPA. If this "Next Great Copyright Act" starts to gain any momentum, you can be sure there will be another, even greater blackout and/or more intense civil resistance. I wouldn't be surprised if some other biggies like YouTube, Facebook and Twitter join the fray.



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