It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Scientists to Unveil 'Major Discovery' at Astrophysics Center Monday

page: 3
18
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 12:14 PM
link   
This is from the site linked above:



Printer-friendly

MARCH 17 - 21, 2014

MONDAY, MARCH 17

10:30 am: Atomic and Molecular Physics Division Seminar. "Using ACE-FTS to Explore the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere," Felicia Kolonjari, Department of Physics, University of Toronto. Pratt Conference Room. Abstract: The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) is a mission on-board the Canadian satellite SCISAT. Its primary instrument is a high-resolution infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). With its large spectral range, the ACE-FTS is capable of measuring a wide range of gases including key CFC and HCFC species. These families of species are of interest because of their significant contribution to anthropogenic ozone depletion and to climate change. To assess the quality of data derived from satellite measurements, validation using other data sources is essential. Ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers are particularly useful for this purpose. To understand the global atmospheric distribution of CFC-11, CFC-12, and HCFC-22, a combined measurement/model approach is used. In this talk, I will discuss some of our validation efforts and new applications of the ACE-FTS data set.

Noon: Solar, Stellar, and Planetary Sciences Division Seminar. "Towards Accurate Ages of Stars Using Asteroseismology," Saskia Hekker, MPI for Solar System Research, Goettingen. Pratt Conference Room. Abstract: Over the past decade asteroseismology -- the study of internal structures of stars through their global oscillations -- has leaped forward thanks to the space borne telescopes CoRoT and Kepler. These satellites have provided photometric timeseries data of unprecedented quality for hundreds of low-mass main-sequence stars and tens of thousands of red-giant stars. In this presentation, I will discuss (some of) the groundbreaking discoveries made over the past decade and provide prospects to use asteroseismology to determine accurate ages of stars.


Is this it?
edit on 17-3-2014 by gspat because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 12:23 PM
link   

MystikMushroom
Correct me if I'm wrong, but does this mean they found some kind of "signal" in the cosmic background?

Not a signal, but polarization. Basically, the light of CMB got "twisted" by gravitational waves that resulted from inflation.

Measuring CMB's polarization, now that's an ingenious idea!

I found this article (last updated in 2009), which shows the basics and how long this research has been carrying on: cosmology.berkeley.edu...
edit on 17-3-2014 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 01:18 PM
link   
www.youtube.com...

if anyone hasn't posted this, the above link is the scientist Andrei Linde who came up with this theory, pretty cool video.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 02:20 PM
link   
I like this idea,

I am pretty hooked on the simulation hypothesis and the thought of the universe expanding in a near instant I feel would support the argument.




British scientist Dr Jo Dunkley, who has been searching through data from the European Planck space telescope for a B-mode signal, commented: "I can't tell you how exciting this is. Inflation sounds like a crazy idea, but everything that is important, everything we see today - the galaxies, the stars, the planets - was imprinted at that moment, in less than a trillionth of a second. If this is confirmed, it's huge."




So is he saying it all appeared in an instant? Or just space? Because he makes it sound like even the galaxies just appeared, although that is not how its presumed galaxy's form - instantly.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 02:23 PM
link   

AthlonSavage
reply to post by Dolby_X
 


These big announcements always turn out non eventful and forgettable.


Unless you're an astrophysicist



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 02:46 PM
link   

MystikMushroom
Correct me if I'm wrong, but does this mean they found some kind of "signal" in the cosmic background? Didn't Stargate Universe toy with that idea, as the ship Destiny was sent to find it?

They pretty much already knew this. This is sort of like how they'll make a big announcement they "MIGHT have found some evidence AGAIN for the presence of liquid water on Mars!!!!!"

I mean, it's exciting if that is what you spend your entire like researching -- but certainly not to me and I'm a space nut.

EDIT: I was being taught about the expanding universe 30 years ago from my father and encyclopedia.
edit on 17-3-2014 by MystikMushroom because: (no reason given)


Using the word "signal" is a bit confusing I think. It's more like going into a massively huge and ancient cavern and finding that there is faint writing on the walls that can only be seen when using polarized light and cameras. Then suddenly it appears as clear a front page newspaper headline. Then you realize that this pattern is repeated all over the cavern and has remained there for billions of years.

The next thing will be to try and convert that two-dimensional pattern on the surface of the "celestial globe" into three dimensions.
Perhaps even see if it is changing in any way through time - perhaps those waves are still travelling across the universe and creating caustic patterns like sunlight in a swimming pool.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 06:28 AM
link   

Ove38
Ridiculous, they know absolutely nothing about the universe ! We can see or measure 5 % of the universe, the rest (95 %) is "dark matter" and "dark energy" completely unknown.
edit on 17-3-2014 by Ove38 because: (no reason given)


So...it is ridiculous to keep searching for answers? Or is it ridiculous to gather more data and do more research?

I'm not sure what you think is ridiculous, even if you feel they "know absolutely nothing" about the universe. Do you feel it is wrong for them to try to learn things?



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 02:07 PM
link   

Soapusmaximus
I like this idea,

I am pretty hooked on the simulation hypothesis and the thought of the universe expanding in a near instant I feel would support the argument.




British scientist Dr Jo Dunkley, who has been searching through data from the European Planck space telescope for a B-mode signal, commented: "I can't tell you how exciting this is. Inflation sounds like a crazy idea, but everything that is important, everything we see today - the galaxies, the stars, the planets - was imprinted at that moment, in less than a trillionth of a second. If this is confirmed, it's huge."




So is he saying it all appeared in an instant? Or just space? Because he makes it sound like even the galaxies just appeared, although that is not how its presumed galaxy's form - instantly.


Since the CMB pattern was "baked" into the universe when it expanded, I think he means that those gravitational waves rolling around the universe would compress a universe sized cloud of hydrogen gas down into filament patterns, which after several billion years, we now see as galaxies, stars, and possibly planets and moons.




top topics



 
18
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join