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Canadian doctor makes anti-Obamacare senator look like a buffoon

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posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 07:10 AM
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Aytheeist
reply to post by bluesilver
 


I think it's a pride thing. A lot like to be the best at everything, and do it all their own way.

I've lived all my 34 years as a Canadian citizen, and although our heathcare isn't without flaw...I have always loved knowing that if me, someone I know or love, or just someone else whom someone else loves needs important medical attention, they won't be losing their homes for it. I have no issues paying a bit of money off my paycheque to help ensure Canada remains as a first world country with a medical system that takes care of everybody. Everybody. I don't care if I lose $100 a month if that's what the tax % is that goes to our medical system. I have no doubt that the quality of medical care in the US is top-notch. It is. Only problem for their 350 million people is that they have 350 million people. Would be a difficult task for any administration to match yours or our system at 6 and 10 times the population.
edit on 18-3-2014 by Aytheeist because: (no reason given)


Star because that was a well reasoned and fair response.




posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 08:59 AM
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reply to post by bluesilver
 

You state that people pay into the system, and then state it is free access.

Which is it. Free or do you pay for it?



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 10:05 AM
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macman
reply to post by bluesilver
 

You state that people pay into the system, and then state it is free access.

Which is it. Free or do you pay for it?



Technically we do pay for it in taxes, but proportionately it is very cheap. Put it this way, my entire tax year might cost me a few thousand pounds, but for that we get all healthcare costs and loads of social aspects too. This is from the BBC website:

www.bbc.co.uk...

So based on someone earning £25,000 you will pay £1,094 per year to help the NHS.


So if you take that £1094 for healthcare (if you earn £25,000), that works out at something like £90 per month. For that we get (and everyone else gets) unlimited, comprehensive healthcare. Seems like a bit of a bargain to me.

Would you pay £90 per month for all that if you were earning £25,000?



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 10:18 AM
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reply to post by bluesilver
 


So, it isn't free then.

Thanks. Just wanted to have that straightened out.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 11:05 AM
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macman
reply to post by bluesilver
 

So, it isn't free then. Thanks. Just wanted to have that straightened out.
I agree that 'free' is misleading, as it comes out of several levels of taxation. But if it feels free...that's what matters as an aspect of day-to-day life. Ultimately, I do understand that the the majority of Americans objecting to universal health care do so out of concerns about the intrusiveness (and inefficiency) of government, not out of callousness towards their compatriots. There's just gotta be a better way to go about it than to feed the insurance companies.

Bottom line...here we regard health care as a human right. There, you don't. I suppose that should not be subject to judgement.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 11:10 AM
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NavyDoc

Leonidas

macman
reply to post by thov420
 


www.salon.com...
Salon of all places has a decent explanation of the law in question.

It is a law stating that US hospitals must treat anyone that comes in through the doors, regardless of their ability to pay.

It has put numerous hospitals into bankruptcy.



I don't think you understand how bizarre Canadians find the concept of a "bankrupt hospital" in a civilized country.
edit on 17-3-2014 by Leonidas because: (no reason given)


Shrug. We find a 39 week wait for a hip replacement bizarre for a civilized country as well.


How many hip replacements does a bankrupt hospital perform?



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 11:10 AM
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JohnnyCanuck

Bottom line...here we regard health care as a human right. There, you don't. I suppose that should not be subject to judgement.


Here in America we regard personal choice as a human right. There, you don't.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 11:15 AM
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thesaneone

JohnnyCanuck

Bottom line...here we regard health care as a human right. There, you don't. I suppose that should not be subject to judgement.


Here in America we regard personal choice as a human right. There, you don't.
Gee...unless you happen to be a woman seeking an abortion...or is that opening up a whole new can of worms unnecessarily?



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 11:33 AM
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JohnnyCanuck

thesaneone

JohnnyCanuck

Bottom line...here we regard health care as a human right. There, you don't. I suppose that should not be subject to judgement.


Here in America we regard personal choice as a human right. There, you don't.
Gee...unless you happen to be a woman seeking an abortion...or is that opening up a whole new can of worms unnecessarily?


"The government has no place in my computer or my home. But a woman's body? Well that is just common sense."



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 11:34 AM
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thesaneone

JohnnyCanuck

Bottom line...here we regard health care as a human right. There, you don't. I suppose that should not be subject to judgement.


Here in America we regard personal choice as a human right. There, you don't.


Well I could say something flippant but I won't. But I am baffled by your stance. I have personal choice, I could go private care if I wished but I don't need to. I suppose the best thing I can say in this instance would be that you are obviously free to have your personal choice of a bad health care system, just as we are using our personal choice to have a great, universal, cheap one.

I prefer our personal choice. No idea why you would choose yours.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 11:53 AM
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reply to post by macman
 


You are right, it isn't free. It just just feels like it because it is so cheap and so good.
edit on 18-3-2014 by bluesilver because: less wordy



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 12:32 PM
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JohnnyCanuck

So, it isn't free then. Thanks. Just wanted to have that straightened out.
I agree that 'free' is misleading, as it comes out of several levels of taxation. But if it feels free...that's what matters as an aspect of day-to-day life. Ultimately, I do understand that the the majority of Americans objecting to universal health care do so out of concerns about the intrusiveness (and inefficiency) of government, not out of callousness towards their compatriots. There's just gotta be a better way to go about it than to feed the insurance companies.
So, your operating in life and are happy because it "feels" free????
This is insanity.



JohnnyCanuck
Bottom line...here we regard health care as a human right. There, you don't. I suppose that should not be subject to judgement.

Our rights are defined very clearly.

Are yours??



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 12:33 PM
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reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 


I guess rights stop when it comes to an unborn child????



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 12:43 PM
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macman
So, your operating in life and are happy because it "feels" free????
This is insanity.
Actually, to the rest of the civilised world, insanity is losing your home because you get sick. Hence, the thread.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 


Most people in the U.S lost there homes because they were living beyond their means and not reading what they were signing when they had to have that 300.000 dollar house when they only make 65.000 a year.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 12:56 PM
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thesaneone
reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 


Most people in the U.S lost there homes because they were living beyond their means and not reading what they were signing when they had to have that 300.000 dollar house when they only make 65.000 a year.
That's not the issue, is it? My mother-in-law used to work for a hospital in New Jersey and her job was to prepare mortgages for patients who had suffered catastrophic health events. We, in turn, show a card.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 01:11 PM
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macman
reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 


I guess rights stop when it comes to an unborn child????


At least you are completely predictable.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by macman
 


Ok then, as we have cleared up the cost aspect, would you pay £80 a month (or less if you don't earn £25,000) for unlimited healthcare for your family and everyone else in your country? And remember, this is for first world service, good hospitals, doctors and infrastructure.

I'm just curious because for the life of me I can't work out the negative in this system, and neither can the rest of us who use it around the world, but you seem to see it.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 01:21 PM
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macman

Our rights are defined very clearly.

Are yours??


According to Wikipedia, canada has an "Implied bill of rights", "Canadian Bill Of Rights", and "Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms". Thankfully all of these seem to have been written in the last century, so there are far fewer issues regarding interpretation.
edit on 18-3-2014 by NonsensicalUserName because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 01:26 PM
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nevermind
edit on 18-3-2014 by NonsensicalUserName because: stupid attack post



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