Should the Bible be used as a textbook in schools?

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posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 04:08 PM
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Should we start using the bible as a text book in the classroom?
Maybe so. It may teach atheists a little about religion (or Christianity at least) and help them realize it is a part of our society and always has been. (It's not a bad thing to know about religion even if you don't believe in it.) Perhaps then they may not demand that the word God be stricken from every sign, monument, building and document (including the Declaration of Independence). They may learn to respect our roots about who we were and who we are today.

On the other hand, Im sure Christians would love it to replace those science books that discuss evolution. Evolution always causes people to ask more questions.

What a sad world this would be if that happened.




posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 04:40 PM
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Of the school system to teach our children about religion. That is and always has been the responsibility of the parents.

I have a daughter who I would like to give the opportunity to choose her own path. So I allow her to study and show interest in many religions. For although she is my daughter, I do not have the right to choose her life path for her, or choose her religious beliefs.

I just wish people would stop trying to force other people to accept or convert to their religion. So were different. We think different, worship different, so what? Why do we insist on forcing religion down someone elses throat?
I would prefer to have the freedom to partake in my religious or non religious practices in my home, with my family, and not have to have it shoved down my childs throat.

Just my thoughts.

On the other hand.......If they were to explore different religions each semester...that would be a different story.


AF1

posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 04:44 PM
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I think it should. The kids can read it in their mythology classes along with all the other great stories like Zeus and Hercules.



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 04:50 PM
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Originally posted by jupiter869
Should we start using the bible as a text book in the classroom?


Should The Satanic Bible be taught as a text book in school? After all there have been Satanists throughout history and it wouldnt hurt the kids to learn a little about them. They could hold black masses before football games and Halloween would take on a whole new meaning.



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 04:51 PM
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My question would be what class would you teach it in? Science? History? *This is about as sarcastic as I can get*

The only option would be to create a new class for religion. If the Bible is going to be taught, then how about the Quran, the Kami of Shintoism, or to take it a step further in the interst of fairness, the seven sacred writings of the Church of Satan.

If one is allowed into the classroom, shouldn't all be? If people really want to learn about the bible, there's a place for it, it's called church.



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 04:55 PM
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I studied the Bible in Arts at Uni, it was a part of the compulsory curriculum, I think it's important to have a clear understanding of the cultural and historical significance of the King James Version.

There's a fundamental difference between teaching someone about the Bible, and teaching them to beleive in God.

I think it is better that the state not involve itself in teaching children which God to worship, but I do see the merits in teaching children about the Bible.



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 04:59 PM
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Originally posted by Flange Gasket
I think it is better that the state not involve itself in teaching children which God to worship, but I do see the merits in teaching children about the Bible.


Should they also teach them about, devil worship, hinduism, Judism, the Koran, wicca,etc?

That is the problem when most people say they should be allowed to teach about religion and the bible in school what they REALLY mean is THEIR religion and bible.

If they teach one they have to teach at the least the Major ones



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 05:19 PM
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Not every Christian wants to throw evolution and other science out the _ Im christian and i always loved evolution. I just think of it as the way God created people. But the bible should not be tought in public school because most of the stuff in it is probably stories. The only way it could be in a class without creating a new class would be history. They would only use it to talk about Egypt, Rome and Israel.



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 05:45 PM
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Originally posted by dragn
My question would be what class would you teach it in? Science? History? *This is about as sarcastic as I can get*

The only option would be to create a new class for religion. If the Bible is going to be taught, then how about the Quran, the Kami of Shintoism, or to take it a step further in the interst of fairness, the seven sacred writings of the Church of Satan.

If one is allowed into the classroom, shouldn't all be? If people really want to learn about the bible, there's a place for it, it's called church.



In the UK(scotland at least) we have one period a week called RE-religes education were we learn about loads of diffret religens(up until the 3th year of secondry wich is the 10th year of school) after that you can choose to take a subject called RMPS-religes moral and philisofical studeys- in 5th/6th year were you study 2 diffrent religens one of which is usaly christanty.



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 06:05 PM
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I'll make you a deal.

As soon as every Church is required to use Howard Zinn's "A People's History of the United States", every School should be required to use a KJV translation of the bible. Sound fair?

The point is that Church is for Bibles, and School isnt.



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 06:11 PM
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How about no...end of story...



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 06:16 PM
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Originally posted by Thorfinn Skullsplitter
How about no...end of story...


Well, be honest...It makes it fair, and it makes about as much sense...

Why should a Bible be used in a School, and why should a factual book of history be used in a church?



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 06:38 PM
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In private Christian schools, yes. They have the right to teach their children any view they choose.

Not in public schools. no.

Way too many problems involved with that.

BG



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 06:47 PM
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Originally posted by Amuk
Should they also teach them about, devil worship, hinduism, Judism, the Koran, wicca,etc?

If they teach one they have to teach at the least the Major ones


Sign me up.

Maybe it's just the atheist in me but I actually like the idea of a literature class that reads and discusses the world's religious works. A comparison of their similarities, differences, their origins - something that provides students with an opportunity to gain a greater understanding and tolerance for others.

I'm all for it.
B.



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 06:58 PM
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If you're a History or English or Anthropology major, you must study the Bible, because it (and I'm talking the KJV here) is basic to the study of those disciplines.

Not that the Bible is true history, of course; it isn't. But it does provide interesting correlations that can help us 'fill in the blanks' of early history of nomadic tribes in that area.

As far as English -- from either a literaty or linguistic point of view -- all I can say is that, as an example of 16th century literature, the KJV matches Shakespeare and Marlowe and surpasses anything else written in the English language during that time.

And from a linguistic point of view, the Bible's a wonderful textbook on the evolution (uh-oh!) of the English language; and, if enough people who read and quoted the Bible actually knew a bit about the history of English language, it would get rid of that silly "but it says 'thou shalt not kill'!" argument against wars, just or otherwise.

Anthropology? It is the most commonly-read and understood of the world's creation-myths, since it tends to subsume both the Jewisn and Muslim accounts;and has a heck of a lot more relevance to everyday activities today that either Shinto's view of Amaterasu-o-mi-kami or the Mayan Popul Vuh.

When we ignore the Bible -- even leaving religion out of it, if we may -- we end up impoverishing ourselves from a literary, historical, anthropological and who-knows-else what aspect.



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 07:59 PM
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While I'm not Christian, I also think people should know a bit about ALL religions because it helps them understand those around them. I don't think it should stop at the Bible, however, but be an overview of world religions in general.

It's interesting that you posed this topic, because it WAS used in my high school as a text for a 12 grade AP English class. Our teacher made it clear we would not be discussing the religion of Christianity, but reading the Bible as we would any other book of fiction or non fiction, and we were simply analyzing the stories within. We focused mainly on the old testament, and studied the writing style, use of charachter, motivation, etc. A note about my high school: it was in Northern VA - an extremely diverse area with an equally diverse school system (41 languages/dialects spoken). Many religions were represented by the students in that class, and everyone handled it well and no one seemed to take offense at the assignments. The teacher wasn't Christian, and didn't use it to preach to us - just as a piece of litterature.



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 08:18 PM
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Should the Bible be used as a textbook in schools?


Unless attending a sanctioned Christian school (elementary, Middle/Junior high, high school) or college, no.



seekerof



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 08:59 PM
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Originally posted by Off_The_Street
If you're a History or English or Anthropology major, you must study the Bible, because it (and I'm talking the KJV here) is basic to the study of those disciplines.

Not that the Bible is true history, of course; it isn't. But it does provide interesting correlations that can help us 'fill in the blanks' of early history of nomadic tribes in that area.

As far as English -- from either a literaty or linguistic point of view -- all I can say is that, as an example of 16th century literature, the KJV matches Shakespeare and Marlowe and surpasses anything else written in the English language during that time.

And from a linguistic point of view, the Bible's a wonderful textbook on the evolution (uh-oh!) of the English language; and, if enough people who read and quoted the Bible actually knew a bit about the history of English language, it would get rid of that silly "but it says 'thou shalt not kill'!" argument against wars, just or otherwise.

Anthropology? It is the most commonly-read and understood of the world's creation-myths, since it tends to subsume both the Jewisn and Muslim accounts;and has a heck of a lot more relevance to everyday activities today that either Shinto's view of Amaterasu-o-mi-kami or the Mayan Popul Vuh.

When we ignore the Bible -- even leaving religion out of it, if we may -- we end up impoverishing ourselves from a literary, historical, anthropological and who-knows-else what aspect.


Actually, you're a bit off on that part. Much of what we understand of early Jewish history, as well as that of Babylon, Assyria, etc is taken from the Bible. It has been an invaluable resource to historians, scholars, and archeologists.
Now, stories like that of Jonah are open to inerpretation, but most scholars will agree that these are merely stories.

But, back to the main question. I agree with what many of the others have said. There is nothing wrong with using the Bible as required reading in a literature class.



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 09:15 PM
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Some of you would have been very disappointed if Ol' TC didn't weigh in on this particular thread. Some of you might also be surprised by my answer to this as well.

First, to respond to a couple earlier responses.

True, as it was pointed out, it is not the responsibility of the school to teach Christianity, but as this is a Christian nation, and I have proven time and time again on this board that it is a Christian nation (At least was founded to be one), it would harm nothing. The teaching would have to be very generic, not going anwhere near any of the topics that separate the several denominations, though.

To the question of wether or not the reading of the Satanic Bible would be acceptable - sure, in a Satanic nation. Satan is the destroyer, not the builder, so you might have problems finding the right nation for that, though.

Now, as time is running out and I'm going to have to run to work, let me get to my answer to that question: No. Not particularly. Here's my reason why.

The schools should be focusing on Reading, Writing and Arithmetic, not to mention hard sciences and languages. It should spend all its resources on these topics and no time on either religion or the liberal social engineering topics. It takes minimum of 12 years to prepare a human to enter the workforce, and with the changing of the world, both high and low tec jobs being outsourced, the child needs as much information as possible to compete. Parents need to turn off the TV and do their jobs of rearing their offspring.

Ok, some of you can pick yourselves off the floor. I'm going to work now.



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 10:26 PM
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I think it should be teached in schools as a text book, especially along side the lord of the rings as a history paper.

It is a story, if i write a story right now and use names and places of long forgotten people, does that make it fact? no.

But it's enevitable, with bush and his jihad/crusade, whatever you want to call it. have fun with that.





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