Herbs of Utnapisjtim: Arctium

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posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 06:52 AM
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Firstly, thanks to Rickymouse, Bluesma and others for inspiring ths thread.

The tistle Arctium (plant pictured above is Arctium Lappa Officinalis), commonly known as Burdock is of the family Asteraceae and is found all over the world. As with many other medical herbs and herbs used in cooking, it has been spread to remote regions of the world by settlers and explorers, eventhough it's indigenous origin is Europe. It carries a reputation of being a noxious weed, but with the right care it is useful both as herbal medicine and in cooking.

It's one of those plants that cleanse the blood and may work wonders for some by helping the liver and kidney functions, and it bears a strong reputation in traditional Chinese and European herbal medicine, for removing toxins and unfriendly chemicals from the body and have a good effect on many skin conditions, like acne and all kinds of scaly skin conditions like psoriasis and eczema. All of the plant is used, seeds, root and leaves, and is administered both internally and externally.

Burdock roots are also good for cooking and can to some extent replace or work as a supplement with potatoes and carries lots of fibre. It tastes like something in between potatoes and cellery.

Burdock root is rich in inulin (NOT insulin). From herballegacy.com (link below):

As before mentioned, it contains inulin, a carbohydrate that strengthens the liver. The high concentration of inulin and mucilage aids in the soothing effects on the gastrointestinal tract. The high concentration of inulin is helpful for individuals that are afflicted with diabetes and hypoglycemia as it provides helpful sugar that does not provoke rapid insulin production. Inulin, which is very high in Burdock, is a resinoid or camphor-like hydrocarbon that is aromatic, stimulant, expectorant, tonic, stomachic, and antiseptic.

Burdock Root contains polyacetylenes that gives the herb its antibacterial and antifungal properties. It is used as a mild laxative that aids in the elimination of uric acid or gout. It is classified as an alterative, diuretic and diaphoretic. It helps the kidneys to filter out impurities from the blood very quickly. It clears congestion in respiratory, lymphatic, urinary and circulatory systems. Burdock releases water retention, stimulates digestion, aids kidney, liver and gallbladder function. It also functions as an aperient, depurative, and antiscorbutic.


Side note: George de Mestral, the inventor of velcro, received an eureka moment after burdock burrs got stuck to his dog’s fur. He put the burr under a microscope and velcro saw light of day soon after. In Norwegian we even call velcro 'borrelås' lit. 'burr-lock'.

Warning: Burdock may damage the foetus during pregnancy, so it's a nono during pregnancy and while breastfeeding your baby[1]. Also, if you have problems with ulcers, reflux or irritable bowels, burdock may worsen these conditions [2].

Like with all herbs, research the plants thoroughly and if you are in doubt, consult your GP before using it.

Sources:
www.amazon.com...
www.botanical.com...
en.wikipedia.org...
Burdock at Witchipedia
www.herballegacy.com...
[1] www.livestrong.com...
[2] health.howstuffworks.com...
edit on 12-3-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: Added rickymouse
edit on 12-3-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: Kinky kidneys haha




posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 06:59 AM
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Utnapisjtim
It's one of those plants that cleanse the blood and may work wonders for some by helping the liver and kinkey functions,


Another great read.

But I have to ask. Is it supposed to be Kidney functions? Just wondering. But it could be a natural Viagra maybe.



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 07:11 AM
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TDawgRex

Utnapisjtim
It's one of those plants that cleanse the blood and may work wonders for some by helping the liver and kinkey functions,


Another great read.

But I have to ask. Is it supposed to be Kidney functions? Just wondering. But it could be a natural Viagra maybe.


Hehe. "Just stick 20-30 burrs to yer bollocks and..." no, I don't think so, but who knows? Edited the op lol
edit on 12-3-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: Edited the edited text



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 07:35 AM
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another great thread Uti
burdock grows wild around here
www.skillsforwildlives.com...

get them in the start of the second year or the very and of the first ( mark some yearlings so you can find them in the spring )
don't mistake them for foxglove...


if i may, so all your good work stays easily avaliable and gets lots of readers
could you copy all the links to the herb threads in a collection at the bottom of each op so all the herbs are easy for readers to find...? or link to a list of links on a master thread..?



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 07:55 AM
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Danbones
another great thread Uti
burdock grows wild around here
www.skillsforwildlives.com...

get them in the start of the second year or the very and of the first ( mark some yearlings so you can find them in the spring )
don't mistake them for foxglove...


Indeed, it shares the colour of foxglove, and like with all herbs, make note of the details in their discriptions so you don't mix them up. This is in part also the reason why I use Latin names of these plants, since many of the common names are used to include other genuses and strains. If you are in doubt, do further research and consult an experienced herbalist or botanist. It can lit. mean the difference between life and death in some cases.


if i may, so all your good work stays easily avaliable and gets lots of readers
could you copy all the links to the herb threads in a collection at the bottom of each op so all the herbs are easy for readers to find...? or link to a list of links on a master thread..?


Lets see how far this series goes, and since it seems to be rather popular, I could perhaps ask if they'd make a master sticky thread or something later on. Good ideas



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 08:04 AM
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I really enjoy the young taproots peeled and boiled.
Quite tasty.
The dried stem can also be used to make a spindle for friction fire making.

Plant is very useful for promoting kinkey functions!
woo hoo! Ouch! yes! yes!
edit on 12-3-2014 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 08:13 AM
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reply to post by TDawgRex
 


It appears to be a thistle of some kind. And thistles are very good at detoxification and good for the renal system.



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 08:17 AM
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Asktheanimals
I really enjoy the young taproots peeled and boiled.
Quite tasty.


So I keep hearing. They are quite scarce around here actually, so I don't want to remove the few that are around. I'll try to keep the plant in mind when scavenging for seeds when autumn comes.


The dried stem can also be used to make a spindle for friction fire making.


Didn't know that. Great tip! Thanks for adding!



Plant is very useful for promoting kinkey functions!
woo hoo! Ouch! yes! yes!


Yeah, rub it in lol. A Freudian slip of proportions. I have them all the time, guess even my subconcious has a terrible sense of humour.



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 08:22 AM
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Thecakeisalie
reply to post by TDawgRex
 


It appears to be a thistle of some kind. And thistles are very good at detoxification and good for the renal system.


In doing research into burdock it's apparently famed for it's blood purifying elements and were much talked about and apparently it's one of the best herbs around for herbal detox and purifying blood, ridding the body of toxins.
edit on 12-3-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: Syntactical



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 08:27 AM
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reply to post by Utnapisjtim
 


Glad to see you keeping up the good work.

Mixed with your previous 'dandelion' thread, this makes my favourite (non-alcoholic) drink...



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 08:52 AM
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KilgoreTrout
reply to post by Utnapisjtim
 

Mixed with your previous 'dandelion' thread, this makes my favourite (non-alcoholic) drink...


You don't have to reveal your special recipe, but which parts of the plants do you use and do you prepare it as a tea? Hot or cold, that kind of stuff would be useful for anyone who wants to try making their own? Some of you guys seem to be quite experienced with making all kinds of tonics, teas, salve and what not from herbs. It would be a good idea for a new thread/series, but since I don't really have the experience and knowledge needed, perhaps you or someone else could start a thread about herbal recipes? Just a thought....

And don't feel bad about posting about alcoholic beverages in my threads, I just don't drink it much anymore, since it doesn't mix well with my prescrption medicine, and I realised a while back that I have difficulties drinking responsibly anyway



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 09:17 AM
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Utnapisjtim

Burdock root is rich in inulin (NOT insulin). From herballegacy.com (link below):

As before mentioned, it contains inulin, a carbohydrate that strengthens the liver. The high concentration of inulin and mucilage aids in the soothing effects on the gastrointestinal tract. The high concentration of inulin is helpful for individuals that are afflicted with diabetes and hypoglycemia as it provides helpful sugar that does not provoke rapid insulin production.



Inulin makes you fart like hell, would rather disagree on the soothing effects on the gastrointestinal tract. LOL



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 09:22 AM
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TatTvamAsi

Utnapisjtim

Burdock root is rich in inulin (NOT insulin). From herballegacy.com (link below):

As before mentioned, it contains inulin, a carbohydrate that strengthens the liver. The high concentration of inulin and mucilage aids in the soothing effects on the gastrointestinal tract. The high concentration of inulin is helpful for individuals that are afflicted with diabetes and hypoglycemia as it provides helpful sugar that does not provoke rapid insulin production.



Inulin makes you fart like hell, would rather disagree on the soothing effects on the gastrointestinal tract. LOL


Hehe. Just mentioned natural gas in another thread here. Oh, the irony....



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 09:29 AM
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TatTvamAsi


Inulin makes you fart like hell, would rather disagree on the soothing effects on the gastrointestinal tract. LOL


OMG! Like I wrote in another thread, I drink a tea made of Burdock often- like almost daily, for my skin... but wondered why I keep getting such bad gas!! I've been tweaking my diet and experimenting to find out what causes it, but hadn't thought of the Burdock as cause. My colleagues will be thankful I figured it out.

I do not sweat much, and so it seems I have trouble ridding my body of toxins- and it comes out in boils or acne. I think the Burdock aids in that.

I buy the roots, dried, and just throw some in when I make herbal teas at night. I end up eating them after I have drunk it, because they really are good- the taste reminds me a bit of artichoke.



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 09:54 AM
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reply to post by Bluesma
 


Last year I grew some Jerusalem artichoke in my garden. Makes a really tasty and creamy soup and the 'aftereffects' are astounding.
Jerusalem artichoke also contains massive amounts of inulin.



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 10:06 AM
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reply to post by Bluesma
 


BTW, inulin is used in industrial food processing as replacement for sugar, fat and flour. Thus, for example low fat cream substitutes normally contain a lot of inulin.



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 01:08 PM
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I have been following your thread series on herbs to see which ones you bring up. Thought at one point to start a series on herbs as well, but it seems you got there first. Good one!
edit on 12-3-2014 by TatTvamAsi because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 01:30 PM
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TatTvamAsi
I have been following your thread series on herbs to see which ones you bring up. Thought at one point to start a series on herbs as well, but it seems you got there first. Good one!


Feel free to join me in the quest for more awareness around useful herbs. Like I said in another reply in one of these threads, someone should start a thread about experiences with said herbs. Since I'm quite new to all this, wise words based on experience greater than mine would be much appreaciated, and much is desired.

It's quite easy sifting through books and websites to make these threads of mine (Herbs of Utnapisjtim), but harder, for me, to come with educated knowledge related to more practical use and experienced effects, pros and cons and so on, so I would naturally welcome anyone better than meself to take over or to start other, even similar threads to mine, after all I don't own or have monopoly in this knowledge found in these threads, it's a way of learning for me, and sharing this gives me an oportunity to reherse and get even more useful knowledge out of my endavours. So in a way I have strong incentives both in researching this and sharing it, but none of those incentives weigh stronger than aquireing more precise and substanciated knowledge, so please, I may have beat you to it time-wise, but as for quality and experience, you might just be the one to beat me to it. Competition often leads to better products alltogether


Thanks for contributing



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 02:07 PM
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reply to post by Utnapisjtim
 


Well, I don't have much more experience on applying the said herbal remedies. Have used wild herbs and weeds in salads etc. Once I made my own cough syrup out of dried Pimpinella saxifraga, Inula helenium, Bellis perennis and Borrago officinalis, some pure alcohol and honey. It worked quite well, better than the stuff they give from the pharmacy. Don't ask for a recipe, it was made with intuition.
Currently have knowledge of about 400 different poisonous, edible as well as medicinal plants that grow in my area. So, same as you, collecting information and learning.



posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by TatTvamAsi
 


Please drop by these threads from time to time and if you notice any insufficient, missing or even mis-leading or wrong info, feel free to fill in. I'd appreaciate your view and knowledge.





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