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Malasyian Flight Hit By Meteorite?

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posted on Mar, 12 2014 @ 03:31 PM

If the plane hit the water in such a way could it in theory sink without coming apart?

Yes. Sullenbeeerger did it with the USAir aircraft.

posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 06:45 PM
Ok, I think this needs to be re-visited with the new 'catastrophic' scenario and the altitude change and sharp turn. Were they avoiding a meteor? There have been quite a few of them entering the atmosphere lately and one was reported in South Korea that very night.

09MAR2014 HAYANG, GYEONGSANGBUK-DO, SOUTH KOREA 20.04 KST, GMT +9 10-15 secs NW to SE. I was facing East.

WHITE fire ball with immediate orange tail which was green at the end. Upon entering Earth's atmosphere it created a brilliant light over the town, lighting up the night sky Started off tiny white light and as it closer it got bigger and brighter and was pure white light. Remained intact until it burnt out from what I could see. It appeared to gotten reasonably close to crashing to the ground. I was observing from the 3rd floor of an apartment building and had it not have burnt out, it was within a second of dropping out of view due to a 4 story apartment across the road in front of me. It was travelling extremely high speed.

On March 17 a Fireball landed just north of my location. Nasa is said to be converging on this area looking for pieces of the basketball size meteor that probably broke into golfball size pieces. This meteor was seen in Toronto and was reported on AMS. The thing that I find interesting is that Hydro poles set afire and power outages were reported in Toronto. Yet the explanation offered was that
The Weather Network

Thursday, March 20, 2014, 7:32 PM -
A recent photo by storm chaser Tom Stefanac has been making the rounds on Twitter.
His image features an electrical transformer on fire in the Vaughan area. It's one of many that burst into flames Wednesday evening in southern Ontario.
Well, for starters, Wednesday brought messy weather to southern Ontario.
A combination of drizzle in the atmosphere and salt spray left over from previous snowstorms coated some transformers, sparking electrical fires.
Numerous outages were reported across the region, from St. Catharines, to Hamilton and through the GTA.
At one point, more than 20,000 people were without power in Toronto alone -- but by Thursday evening, service had been restored to most customers.

I can't link the photo as it is copyrighted but could the electrical discharge from the meteor caused a fire or explosion of the lithium batteries in the cargo hold?

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