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Any advice? Extreme headache after cross country flight

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posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 12:45 PM
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I took a trip from the New York area to San Diego a while ago. I have never been on an airplane before, im in my late 20's. Anyway, I had no nausea or discomfort on the flight, but about 6 hours after landing I started having these terrible headaches, starting in the back of my head, and encompassing the whole damned thing shortly, and lasted for hours.

Looked up a few spots that said a lot about headaches during flights, but none about afterward. It ruined my whole vacation, first one in my life too lol. Thank you, hard work and dedication.

So I'm asking if anyone else has had a similar experience or would know what the cause would be. Someone I know said it might have been my sinuses reacting to the pressure differential, so that might be it. But the kicker is that she said the headaches went away after 2 or 3 rounds, mine were almost constant, and even after I flew back home they lasted for a month before eventually dying down. I would take aspirin or whatever to help, but it didn't do much good.

Any ideas? Thanks in advance!




posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by andboycott
 



So I'm asking if anyone else has had a similar experience or would know what the cause would be. Someone I know said it might have been my sinuses reacting to the pressure differential, so that might be it.

Some are more sensitive to it. They tune the pressure differential to an average tolerance. Have you ever dove or scuba'd before and does that give you trouble too?



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 12:55 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


Thank you.. No haven't done either.. but thanks for reminding me, when I was in high school I was in a friend's pool and we were racing to the other end and I hit my head pretty hard against the wall, I didn't think I had reached it yet.. and had headaches after that. And had problems with trying to hold my breath under water for extended periods of time, but I'm fine doing that now..

Likely related. and now I want to see a doctor lol. want to say something about obamacare but cant be witty so quickly



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by andboycott
 



Likely related. and now I want to see a doctor lol. want to say something about obamacare but can't be witty so quickly

Yes you can, lol. I have trouble adjusting my "ears" in deep water, and respond to pressure more painfully than others. Find the deep end of a pool and see how you feel? It might help you to understand without wasting any of Obamas money…


As far as jet liners they adjust cabin pressure automatically as they climb to keep people ignorant to the actual pressure outside. Being more sensitive to that is not always a bad thing. Do your ears pop a lot in flight or when you drive up to high altitude on mountain roads, say?



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 01:16 PM
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I have read that there's a lot of radiation at high altitudes that many flyers are exposed to, maybe that's what happened. Lots of radiation coming in from the west coast via Fukashima.



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 01:16 PM
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Don't be flying if it makes you feel like that. There could be a few causes for that that I know of but I can't actually say what it is. Going fast can cause changes in the brain from the spacial recognition phenomenon. This can sort of overload the brain. You don't actually have to have sight involved for this to go astray. Many people take motion sickness pills for nausea. This is sort of the same but different symptoms.

Differences in pressure like someone said above is possible, but all these headaches should have cleared up in a couple of days. Maybe your blood pressure increased or decreased a little causing problems. It could be something that cannot be fixed, so why fly.



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by andboycott
 


Aspirin will help, just don't take a lot of it.

So let's talk about what's going on when you fly.

You know of course the cabin is pressurized but not to sea level but rather a percentage of the planes cruising altitude.

So lets say the plane is at 30,000 feet the cabin would be pressurized to 8,000

Now you went from NYC to San Diego both cities are at sea level but for however many hours you in the air your body was adjusting to the lower pressure and thinner air... in other words you might have a touch of altitude sickness. I see that all the time, when flat-landers come visit us here in Colorado.

the other thing could be you have a cold or maybe an inner ear infection.

those rapid pressure changes can play hell with your equilibrium. It's dangerous to fly if either condition is true and if that's the prob your lucky if the only bad thing that happened was you walked away with a headache



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 01:42 PM
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Advil - 400mg
Sudaphed - 60mg



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 02:02 PM
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Hi Andboycott, it could be your sinuses. I had a vacation ruined in the same manner. Some people's sinuses are more sensitive to the pressure. In my case it brought on a case of sinusitis. The swelling due to the pressure in the sinuses kept my sinuses from draining which lead to a sinus infection. Your description of your headache was what I experienced.

In the future if you are going to fly you can take something that will keep the sinues open and draining. Another poster suggested sudafed if you care comfortable taking it. I no longer do any pharmecueticals other than ibuprophen. You could try taking a mix of applecider vinegar, honey and cayanne pepper, sounds gross but it truly works wonders in the sinuses. If that sounds unreasonable to you, lol you could maybe eat something spicy hot while flying such as wasabe peas, crystal ginger or even hot peppers. These are the things I use now in place of over the counter meds for sinuses and cold. Hope this helps you.



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 02:16 PM
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reply to post by 2manyholes
 


I prefer natural stuff too, and like spicy! I will keep it in mind. I appreciate the other posters too, thanks for the advice, and to be honest I'm asking because I want to fly again in the near future, taking the almost same trip.

The surfing out there is awesome, lol. It was one of the only things that took my headache away, maybe due to distraction. And was surprised to notice the waters of south Cali were colder than those off of Jersey the same time of year. I learned something today! (I said that day, to quote south park)

And to the poster about the radiation of Fukushima, keep this thread goin, I took a video while I was out there of hundreds of thousands of dead or dying bees on the beaches I plan to upload soon but have to go to my buttcrap job now =\



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 02:18 PM
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Well i didnt get hundreds of thousands in the vid, but if you extrapolate, I mean that shtit was of great concern to me. sincerly, thank you all



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 02:44 PM
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I have both sinus issues and migraines. I just avoid flying like the plague. I can get off the ground OK, but when it comes to landing, the pressure changes cause agonizing pains in my sinuses, ears and jaws until we get off the plane, and I'm prone nasty migraine attacks anywhere from a few to up to 24 hours after the flight. One of them put me in the ER over a Christmas trip to the in-laws. I'm also atmospheric pressure sensitive when it comes to migraines. I have to watch the big spring storm systems. A strong enough low can be a problem if I'm not careful.

These days, I just drive if at all possible or plan around the inevitable illness if not.
edit on 9-3-2014 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-3-2014 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 04:56 PM
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It sounds a lot like an onset of migraine. A new location and climate is a possible key and not the flight itself.

You need to see the doc and tell him exactly what happened, since hypoxia does not seem to be the cause here.

Just to add, I would often get extreme pain in the temple above the eye. Although this would last for a very short time, the circumstances are always the same, sudden changes of temperature. Coming home during the early hours after playing late and going straight to bed. I don't do that now even though it means going to bed very late, but it works. That is Neuralgia, the nervous system being affected in a specified area. Migraine is the big daddy Neuralgia, and affects the whole nervous system it is thought from the brain stem, but even then it is not fully understood.
edit on 9-3-2014 by smurfy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 05:44 PM
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It sounds like a headache, my advice...toughen up buttercup. No disrespect intended but you don't have to run to the doctor every time you get a headache. It happens. It will go away.

Just some questions now, You gonna go to the ER for a headache?

You have insurance or is this a tax payer funded trip to the ER?

The changes in altitude could have done it, the recycled air, the smog on the west coast?



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 06:05 PM
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w8tn4it
I have read that there's a lot of radiation at high altitudes that many flyers are exposed to, maybe that's what happened. Lots of radiation coming in from the west coast via Fukashima.


The radiation at high altitudes is gamma radiation, and ultraviolet if you're outside. The headaches are almost certainly pressure related. Airliners can only maintain sea level pressure up to a point. For example,i the maximum pressure differential on the Boeing 737 is 7.8 ps. So if you're cruising at 37,000 feet, the pressure in the cabin is equivalent to the pressure,without pressurization, at 8,000 feet. Above 37,000 feet, the max is 8.3. The service ceiling of the 737-800 is 41,000 feet.
Another potential problem is the extremely low humidity of the cabin air. The air you breath in the cabin comes from the outside where it is extremely cold - -100F or so. Air that cold can't hold much water vapor at all. So the sinuses become very dry and on a long flight, dehydration can be an issue.



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 07:12 PM
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reply to post by tinner07
 


No need to be a jerk.



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 07:24 PM
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Detox from heavy metals. Iodide tablets possibly? Oil of oregeno drops. Radiation does come to mind.



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 07:30 PM
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tinner07
It sounds like a headache, my advice...toughen up buttercup. No disrespect intended but you don't have to run to the doctor every time you get a headache. It happens. It will go away.

Just some questions now, You gonna go to the ER for a headache?

You have insurance or is this a tax payer funded trip to the ER?

The changes in altitude could have done it, the recycled air, the smog on the west coast?



If it is a migraine and it lasts for 72 hours or more without stopping for longer than 6 hours, it is a medical emergency. Migraines are caused by altered blood flow in your brain. The altered blood flow in your brain for that length of time starts to increase your stroke risk the longer it goes on. It has a name status migrainosus.

I'm under orders from my neurologists to seek medical treatment from whatever source is available anytime I pull a severe migraine and my normal medications provide no relief, but then, there is no question that I have migraines that will drag on into status migrainosus if I let them. My migraines were chronic before I gained control of them.

Just because people commonly refer to what they are feeling as "headaches" (I know I do with mine) does not mean that is actually all they are. I don't know if this person has been diagnosed with migraine, but if they have, this isn't something to tell them to shrug off. Migraines can be serious and can kill you if you are unlucky and unaware.



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 08:35 PM
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tinner07
It sounds like a headache, my advice...toughen up buttercup. No disrespect intended but you don't have to run to the doctor every time you get a headache. It happens. It will go away.

Just some questions now, You gonna go to the ER for a headache?

You have insurance or is this a tax payer funded trip to the ER?

The changes in altitude could have done it, the recycled air, the smog on the west coast?






The Op said first off that his headache ran from the back of his/her head, that is not something to be passed off as get a life, it is something that needs to be addressed as far as medicine can take it.
The GP will have some clues, but that's up to the OP to provide his/her experience to even before the headache to the after.



posted on Mar, 9 2014 @ 08:36 PM
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Toughen up buttercup? lol

You have no idea. It was very much hell. I've woken up during eye surgery..that was miserable but didn't compare to the constancy of this problem I had. Just because it was so unrelenting. I had to sit down on the sidewalks at times and just grip my head. Couldn't sleep for 2 weeks, except when I was drunk lol..which made the problem worse the next day.

Anywho. maybe I will just avoid flying. I've driven pretty far before, not 3000 miles away, but maybe half that, and never had a problem. Good ideas all around!




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