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Beijing-bound MAS plane carrying 239 people missing as of 20 mins ago.

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posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:32 PM
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xavi1000

fatpastyhead

My apologies, its late and I am tired.


No problem, the fact that the phone ring is great mistery


Why, what would it do otherwise? Just go straight to voicemail? Does that happen 100% of the time?

Ive called the cell phones of people who were in a subway unbeknownst to me at the time, and it did ring out...




posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by Starsandstripes
 


And when there's a sudden structural failure or power loss before a crash? How are you going to transmit then? That's always the problem with these, everything goes through the aircraft systems.



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:33 PM
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reply to post by Bigburgh
 


If I had to take a guess I would say that plane is in tact and hidden.just a guess going by the phones and lack of debris.

I hope the people are OK.



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:33 PM
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Looks like I'm not the only one looking at nuke scenario.

From the AP...



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:36 PM
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xavi1000

fatpastyhead

My apologies, its late and I am tired.


No problem, the fact that the phone ring is great mistery



The phone thing really has me churning, if it is indeed true. My experience is that if I have called anyone with their phone turned off, lest a few like perhaps Sprint, I would get a message of "out of area" or "That number is not available". It would just not ring on...

If you got the persons greeting... well still, that can be sourced from the head end, like Sprint does.

This is a very mysterious, and important part of this thread, as far as I am concerned... but it really does depend upon reliability of the source.



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:37 PM
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reply to post by PhotonEffect
 



I'm sure there was more than 1 phone that was called and rang(could be wrong though). If those phones were smashed, in the sea or switched off they would not ring. If there was no signal they would not ring. So to me, the only logical explanation is that the phones are safe somewhere. If the phones are safe then surely the plane was/is.



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:37 PM
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fatpastyhead
reply to post by Bigburgh
 


If I had to take a guess I would say that plane is in tact and hidden.just a guess going by the phones and lack of debris.

I hope the people are OK.


Me too..



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by SBMcG
 


That has nothing to do with a nuke. They're asking them to look for a high altitude explosion, not a nuclear blast.


Zerbo said infrasound would be the best technology to check for an explosion on the missing plane if there was a monitoring station nearby, "or the explosion is at a level or at an amplitude that it could be detected."

"There's a possibility, it's not absolute, that the technology like the Infrazone could be able to detect" an explosion, he said in response to a question.

hosted.ap.org...



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:40 PM
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msdesertrat
reply to post by SBMcG
 


Except, the US has that "system that looks for flashes around the world" and didn't see anything, according to an anonymous source.

www.nbcnews.com...

Can we be a little more vague please?
Ah! Someone suggested that our military might interject some info in a relatively benign manner that could help the investigation. Maybe this is it?

One could infer that the plane is still intact



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by fatpastyhead
 




fatpastyhead
reply to post by PhotonEffect
 



I'm sure there was more than 1 phone that was called and rang(could be wrong though). If those phones were smashed, in the sea or switched off they would not ring. If there was no signal they would not ring. So to me, the only logical explanation is that the phones are safe somewhere. If the phones are safe then surely the plane was/is.


Quite a leap of logic that requires quite an amount of logistics (if you are assuming that its landed somewhere that nobody knows about). I don't see it.

But for the sake of the passengers and their family I hope you're right.



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by charlyv
 


I thought I just saw Hall former NTSB guy say something about this and how they eject, float on surface, and can be found easier. It was on at about 7 on CNN. I thought he talked about how we should be outraged this isn't on passenger flights, can't find the interview though



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by charlyv
 



Done a quick google on it and loads of sources came up. Not sure if its just the same stuff reposted though.



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:42 PM
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reply to post by Bilk22
 


Well, except for the fact that like American 587, it could have broken apart without exploding, which would mean there was nothing to see by the system.



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:42 PM
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I'm not sure if these bits have been posted, but:


Meanwhile, Malaysian authorities are saying that the two men looked African.

Investigators have checked closed-circuit television footage of the men as they boarded the flight.

“It is confirmed now that they are not Asian-looking men,” Malaysia’s civil aviation chief, Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, told a press conference Monday evening in Kuala Lumpur.

When reporters asked for a description, Mr. Azharuddin referred to Mario Balotelli, an Italian soccer star whose birth parents are from Ghana.

He wouldn’t elaborate. “I don’t want to dwell about it but they are not Asian-looking.”


The info coming out about this can't seem to stay straight at first it was said by officials that they had Asian features.


The two men purchased their tickets in the Thai beach resort of Pattaya, using an Iranian intermediary, reported the Financial Times.

Benjaporn Krutnait, the owner of the Grand Horizon travel agency, told the paper that she had known the Iranian for three years and that he regularly booked flights for himself or others.

The Iranian, whom she only knowns as “Mr. Ali,” asked her to get cheap tickets to Europe for two men on March 1.

The tickets expired before Mr. Ali got back to her so she rebooked the two men on the Malaysia Airlines flight, making the reservation through China Southern Airlines, which code-shares the flight.

She said a friend of Mr. Ali paid for the tickets in cash, adding that such arrangements were common in Pattaya, with the middlemen keeping a commission.



The latest developments seem to suggest that the two men were part of a refugee scam, said security consultant Chris Mathers, who has investigated many cases that involved stolen passports while he was an RCMP officer.

"It doesn't matter that the passport is going to be detected upon arrival. All you need is something that will get you on the plane," Mr. Mathers said.

"When they would get to Beijing, the passports would likely not have been checked because they would be in the in-transit area. Then, when they get on the plane to Europe, they flush the passports and declare refugee status in Europe. This happens a lot."



www.theglobeandmail.com...

Also, from The Telegraph:


One of the Iranian nationals' intended final destination was Frankfurt, where his mother lives, while the other wanted to travel to Denmark.
The same source that spoke to BBC Persian also emailed CNN with a photograph of him posing with his two friends in the days before they embarked on their fateful trip.
An editor at BBC Persian told The Telegraph that the two Iranians were “looking for a place to settle”.
Both Malaysia and neighbouring Thailand, where the passports were originally stolen, host large and established Iranian communities.

www.telegraph.co.uk...
edit on 10-3-2014 by ManiShuck because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:43 PM
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Zaphod58
reply to post by SBMcG
 


That has nothing to do with a nuke. They're asking them to look for a high altitude explosion, not a nuclear blast.


Zerbo said infrasound would be the best technology to check for an explosion on the missing plane if there was a monitoring station nearby, "or the explosion is at a level or at an amplitude that it could be detected."

"There's a possibility, it's not absolute, that the technology like the Infrazone could be able to detect" an explosion, he said in response to a question.

hosted.ap.org...


I would be confident in the assumption that any nuclear explosion on the planet, altitude or not, there would be a room somewhere where people would be looking at it and studying it.



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:43 PM
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Since the phone can ring, telecommunication company can trace it, or NSA (lol).If this news about the phone is true then phone is on the land now, and the searching can be directed on land.
edit on 10-3-2014 by xavi1000 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:43 PM
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reply to post by Cosmocow
 

I saw what you are referring to, it was mentioned some military aircraft have that setup but that passenger planes do not.



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:45 PM
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elitelogic
I know this is a vanishingly small probability, but "Our best estimates of the total incoming meteoroid flux indicate that about 10 to 50 meteorite dropping events occur over the earth each day. It should be remembered, however, that 2/3 of these events will occur over ocean, while another 1/4 or so will occur over very uninhabited land areas, leaving only about 2 to 12 events each day with the potential for discovery by people"

I know these meteorites travel pretty fast.

"Meteoroids enter the earth’s atmosphere at very high speeds, ranging from 11 km/sec to 72 km/sec (25,000 mph to 160,000 mph). However, similar to firing a bullet into water, the meteoroid will rapidly decelerate as it penetrates into increasingly denser portions of the atmosphere. This is especially true in the lower layers, since 90 % of the earth’s atmospheric mass lies below 12 km (7 miles / 39,000 ft) of height"

So, what would the effect of say, a golf ball sized meteorite, travelling at 140,000 mph, be on a plane at the height of 35K feet?

Would it be a massive explosion? (News saying no explosion was detected by U.S. intelligence equipment). Would the plane just fall apart -- disintegrate?

I know the odds of this are astronomically small.

Source: www.amsmeteors.org...


I was thinking this as well there sure have been a slew of them lately. Here is some info I have been putting together

Flight MH370 which departed Kuala Lumpur at 12.41 am earlier this morning(March 8, 2014) bound for Beijing.
This neo made its closest pass to earth as below

2014 EB4 2014-Mar-07 17:19 < 00:01 Earth 0.0214888558079387
Now if we covert UTC to MYT:

Friday, March 7, 2014 at 5:20:00 PM UTC
Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)
equals:
Saturday, March 8, 2014 at 1:20:00 AM MYT
UTC+8 hours

Now what if this object had others with it and was not necessarily the one 2014 EB4 (we were blindsided with the Russian meteor)? The time fits with the flight disappearance. Where would the flight have been 39 minutes into its flight? Did they say contact was lost one to two hours into the flight? Is this where the flight was seen to change direction? Did the flight take evasive maneuvers to avoid collision such as a 60% bank and stall? I know others have suggested this possibility as well.

Link

Cases have been reported where airline pilots have veered their planes off course to avoid a mid-air collision with a fireball, only to find, from research later, that the fireball was 80 to 150 kilometres away and perhaps 30 kilometres higher than the aircraft. A typical fireball first appears at a height of about 130 kilometres above Earth, and usually extinguishes at a height of about 20 kilometres.


Link

It last had contact with air traffic controllers 120 nautical miles off the east coast of the Malaysian town of Kota Bharu. Flight tracking website flightaware.com showed it flew northeast after takeoff, climbed to 35,000 ft and was still climbing when it vanished from tracking records.
There were no reports of bad weather.
"What we have done is actually look into the recording on the radar that we have and we realized there is a possibility the aircraft did make a turnback," Rodzali Daud, the Royal Malaysian Air Force chief, told reporters at a news conference.

Link

Here goes: at any given time, airliners cover 2 billionths of the Earth's surface. There are 125 meteors an hour, each with probability 2x10-9 of striking some airplane. In 20 years, that's about 22 million independent possible impact events. The chance that every one of those meteors misses every airplane is:
> ppois(0,2e-9*22e6)
[1] 0.956954
In other words, there's about a 4.3% chance of a meteor strike on at least one airliner in the next 20 years. (John Conway used a different calculation but came to a similar result.) That's surprisingly large. To repeat: this is almost certainly an over-estimate, and applies not to a single flight but cumulatively to all flights over a 20-year period. Furthermore, there have been no documented cases of a meteor striking an aircraft so far, so even if it did occur we have no idea what kind of damage it would cause, or even if it would lead to a crash. But it's significant enough that it can't be ruled out next time there's an unexplained air crash incident.

Link

A few things I would like to point out. Often times a meteor sighting or to be more precise a bolide sighting is sometimes precluded by unusually intense rain and or hail. This is caused in part by the ice melting off the meteor and coming down as precipitation. This could have been a massive storm caused caused by multiple objects. I believe that the flash of light seen by the pilots on the Air Comet flight (how ironic is it that the name of the airline is Air Comet?) could have been another meteor descending in the area and not necessarily the one that brought Air France down. The other thing that everyone seems to have overlooked when calculating the odds is the fact that the bolide does not have to actually strike the airplane in order to bring it down, it just has to get close enough so that the electromagnetic disturbance caused by it will affect its’ electronic instruments. It seems that the Aerbus is more susceptible to this than older planes. I am looking into reports of meteor sightings coinciding with the same model plane loosing several hundred feet of altitude over Australia in October of 2008. Coincidentally the first ever asteroid tracked from space that had pieces of it recovered on the ground occurred on the same week. Qantas Flight 72 had problems two months later over Australia and that coincided with an uptick in meteoric activity as well. That’s my two cents.

Below is from a blog in the area and has some info that may or may not be correct, just putting it out for discussion.
Link

MH370 missing updates. plane crashed at vietnam, all ppl in the plane died. CNN reported. plane was confirmed crashed at 100km north of Ho Chi Minh city
due to rain storms at ho chi minh. the local ppl thought was meteor crashing. due to locally still raining and hill place, rescue activities facing problem now

and from page 4 of the above link

i read around from the sources inside the country found out that workers from talisman malaysian united oil and gas company stated that the crash happened near their oil plantation on malaysia-vietnam sea border
they joined the rescue team but they said they can't do nothing because the plane was crushed into pieces before plunging deep into the sea. they described it as '______' it's likely the plane exploded on air or there's complete power failure before the fall into the sea. that's why the plane went off radar all of sudden

Wait, so its like it was crushed even before it entered the sea? ...

u know what i'm working with petronas (malaysian oil and gas company). this morning i talked with my superior about this and she said,her friend who's working offshore with talisman (on malaysia-vietnam border) saw the plane crashed. tried to help, but...
and i know this is so hard to believe, but man i don't think she will lie to me though


and another from page 4

Posted 08 March 2014 - 01:33 AM
Apparently the Plane crashed 40 minutes into the flight, so the fact that they reported this news so late is pretty sad...

hmmm 40 minutes into the flight, I asked above with relation to NEO 2014 EB4 where they were approx 39 min into the flight? I know the NEO was not that close to the earth, but the timing sure fits, were there others?
edit on 3/10/2014 by whatnext21 because: quoted wrong person sorry...



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:46 PM
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reply to post by PhotonEffect
 


If it wasn't for the telephones I wouldn't say it but I'm quite good with phones and have worked on and off with them for many years and its that which is making me think this.

There's more things to factor in as to why they shouldn't work so the apparent fact they are working is a bit strange.



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 07:47 PM
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reply to post by OatDelphi
 


When we have tech on military but not commercial it angers me. I mean the safety features




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