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Beijing-bound MAS plane carrying 239 people missing as of 20 mins ago.

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posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 07:06 AM
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It seems this location is going to be relatively easy to survey with the ping-finder. It is mostly flat and sloping off towards a deeep trench 5800m deep.

Seabed of jet hunt zone mostly flat with one trench Couple of good pictures of the Ocean Shield.

However it will take at least a year and a half to survey it all snce the ship pulling the finder will go up and down like a lawn mower and only be able to go at 3 knots while it is pulling the surveyor/finder. As I understand it, although the finder looks smallish, the long length of trailing cable means that a special ship with the correct winches etc is needed to carry the weight/drag.


The zone is huge: about 319,000 square kilometers (123,000 square miles), roughly the size of Poland or New Mexico. But it is closer to land than the previous search zone, its weather is much more hospitable—and Broken Ridge sounds a lot craggier than it really is.

And the deepest part is believed to be 5,800 meters (19,000 feet), within the range of American black box ping locators on an Australian ship leaving Sunday for the area and expected to arrive in three or four days.

Formed about 100 million years ago by volcanic activity, the ridge was once above water. Pulled under by the spreading of the ocean floor, now it is more like a large underwater plain, gently sloping from as shallow as about 800 meters (2,625 feet) to about 3,000 meters (9,843 feet) deep. It got its name because long ago the movement of the Earth's tectonic plates separated it from another plateau, which now sits about 2,500 kilometers (1,550 miles) to the southwest.

Much of Broken Ridge is covered in a sediment called foraminiferal ooze, made of plankton that died, settled and was compacted by the tremendous pressure from the water above.


Also,
MH370 crash: Deep-sea search tools ready for deployment




posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 07:07 AM
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reply to post by judydawg
 

wheres what plane?

its already shifted off the front page



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 07:43 AM
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Not sure if anyone has read about this speculation, but it seems intriguing:

www.bollyn.com...




THE ISRAELI TWIN - Why would Israel have a plane identical to the missing Malaysia Airlines plane in storage in Tel Aviv? - See more at: www.bollyn.com...



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 09:15 AM
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reply to post by one1002
 


Planes are stored all over the world in desert areas. The plane in question was sold by Malaysia during the financial difficulties and stored in Israel. There are several places in the US where you will find planes of all size stored.

Some get parted out and destroyed, some get leased to other airlines, some get sold, and others sit there for years.

It's not some nefarious plot to nuke someone or whatever. Hot dry areas are best for storing planes.



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 10:48 AM
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Zaphod58
reply to post by one1002
 


Planes are stored all over the world in desert areas. It's not some nefarious plot to nuke someone or whatever. Hot dry areas are best for storing planes.


Check Victorville, CA (Former George AFB) on Google Earth to see what Zaph is referring to.



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 11:46 AM
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auroraaus
reply to post by auroraaus
 


Was it the Prime Minister?


It was a televised interview I saw...the man was Abbott, I believe?


Mangosteens and Mangos are entirely different. To the Google mobile with you!!!



Only to discover that Mangosteens are ILLEGAL in the US! The cargo is contra-band over here...

Delicious & a Super-fruit?

That is a conspiracy thread of its own...


Here, GMOs prevail; the closest I could come to mangosteens are pomegranates which I do eat on an almost daily basis...

reply to post by tsingtao
 



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 12:03 PM
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judydawg
reply to post by BurningSpearess
 


This is to everyone don't put any faith in what the pilot said as a sign off. It really isn't a big deal. When pilots are in the cockpit they act just like you and I. It is just not that formal nor from the tower. Pilots know how to fly that plane better than most know how to drive a car.

The shocking thing is, taking this long to find it, at least that what my pilot friends are saying. Where's the plane.


Hello, judydawg,

No, no, no! My emphasis wasn't on the linguistics/semantics/translations of the sign-off. I apologize if I came across that way. It is quite understandable if translations are being made to Malay-Mandarin-English & then we have the media to spin-doctor it...


My point is that the 1st account of the Malaysian PTB said it was the co-pilot signing off...
Now that is ... that is retracted & they are not sure if it was the pilot or the co-pilot speaking last...
Given the differentials between the two pilots' experiences, one would assume that the Airlines would be able to detect one from the other?
Actually, this lead me back to the theory I think you proposed about one pilot knocking off the other...

Of course, all speculation...but I am truly sorry if I offended anyone from my prior post from Reuters/Straittimes...





edit on 1-4-2014 by BurningSpearess because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


reply to post by rockflier
 


Z or R:

Based on your experiences in aviation, I would be interested in hearing (& I can't speak for others, but I'm sure that would be thrilled as well) your theory(s) as to what has happened here. Short of fire, aircraft failure, of course.

Besides the abnormal airplane failure, what theories do you suspect? Thank you...



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 12:42 PM
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BurningSpearess

judydawg
reply to post by BurningSpearess
 


This is to everyone don't put any faith in what the pilot said as a sign off. It really isn't a big deal. When pilots are in the cockpit they act just like you and I. It is just not that formal nor from the tower. Pilots know how to fly that plane better than most know how to drive a car.

The shocking thing is, taking this long to find it, at least that what my pilot friends are saying. Where's the plane.


Hello, judydawg,

No, no, no! My emphasis wasn't on the linguistics/semantics/translations of the sign-off. I apologize if I came across that way. It is quite understandable if translations are being made to Malay-Mandarin-English & then we have the media to spin-doctor it...


My point is that the 1st account of the Malaysian PTB said it was the co-pilot signing off...
Now that is ... that is retracted & they are not sure if it was the pilot or the co-pilot speaking last...
Given the differentials between the two pilots' experiences, one would assume that the Airlines would be able to detect one from the other?
Actually, this lead me back to the theory I think you proposed about one pilot knocking off the other...

Of course, all speculation...but I am truly sorry if I offended anyone from my prior post from Reuters/Straittimes...





edit on 1-4-2014 by BurningSpearess because: (no reason given)


No I understand what you are saying they have lied, about the sign off.

Now what do we have left??????

If the course they showed us is correct?!? what happened, I don't believe the southern route.


pilot shot other pilot

fire

mechanical problems

hijacking

radar incorrect

everyone feel free to add whatever...




posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 12:50 PM
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reply to post by rockflier
 


And of course Davis-Monthan in Arizona for the dry climate for aircraft storage.There's always a FEW old airframes there in the famous boneyard.



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by Imagewerx
 


Near Davis-Monthan for the military, Roswell, Kingman, and Mojave for commercial aircraft. Mojave is huge, and has a few hundred aircraft sitting there, including a couple dozen 747s.



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 02:15 PM
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reply to post by qmantoo
 


The point is that they have not even located the debris field for MH370 yet therefore don't even know where to conduct a sonar search.

The new search location has been dictated by the Malaysian Government and spurious claims that MH370 was also the unidentified aircraft seen loitering about the Straits of Malacca. If you strip away that spurious assumption and take it from where the oil rig worker sighted an aircraft on fire then it is about 6.37 hours flying away from the southern coast of Vietnam at a speed of 471 knots which gives you a 3,000nm line from the southern tip of Vietnam to where it intersects the the INMARSAT ping radius plus some extra for glide distance.

The real location is nearer to 350nm southeast of Isle St Paul, or 400nm NE of Kerguelen Islands and nobody is going to listen for black box locator pings in that area before batteries run out.



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 02:24 PM
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You can track Ocean Shield here

Vessel tracker



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 02:39 PM
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The reason why Israel raises eyebrows with a stored ex MAS B777, is due down to the extensive reports of possible links to terrorism AKA Mossad/Cia/Al ky, and when Israel pops up - some people see a link with False Flag terror campains.



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 02:43 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 



Thease are some of the most amazing places for aircraft spotters, one day my dream destination would be to visit and photograph these locations..




posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 02:51 PM
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reply to post by UKGuy1805
 


One of the rewards of being a truck driver. I've been past them all.



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 04:50 PM
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UKGuy1805
reply to post by Zaphod58
 



Thease are some of the most amazing places for aircraft spotters, one day my dream destination would be to visit and photograph these locations..


Me too,all I get is Gatwick with about 100 Easy Jet flights every hour.



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 04:55 PM
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Cockpit transcript from this CNN link.

Guess this "explains" the non-story yesterday about the last words from the flight being different.



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 06:02 PM
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~Lucidity
Cockpit transcript from this CNN link.

Guess this "explains" the non-story yesterday about the last words from the flight being different.


Thank you for posting that transcript. I read something suspicious on there. Check out the image below for the words I find suspect.

What I see in the transcript is whoever was on the radio of MH370 replied to Lumpur Approach, "...Malaysian one err, three seven zero."
He almost said, "...Malaysian one six." That looks like he was getting ahead of himself by using his planned new flight MH16 identity! This is the smoking gun. MH370 disappeared by turning off their transponder and turning on a new transponder identifying itself as MH16! See the below Flightradar24 screen capture for the proximity of flight MH16.



posted on Apr, 1 2014 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by Mikeultra
 


Wow, so now pilots aren't human and have to be perfect.




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