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Beijing-bound MAS plane carrying 239 people missing as of 20 mins ago.

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posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 06:37 PM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


And it changed nothing. Someone along the way left off the flight number, that's all.




posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 06:42 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 

I know. Yet it's breaking news. As if it means something.

Interesting that CNN is really sticking with this one. None of the others seem to be.



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


They're out of other news with this, so their big breaking story is this. They'll work every conceivable angle and jump to twelve different conclusions.



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


They are now 'Suggesting', perhaps, that the Captain said, GOOD NIGHT MALAYSIAM THREE SEVEN ZERO and then he put such to bed, hence the silence ??????????? Wow,



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 07:18 PM
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steaming
reply to post by Zaphod58
 


They are now 'Suggesting', perhaps, that the Captain said, GOOD NIGHT MALAYSIAM THREE SEVEN ZERO and then he put such to bed, hence the silence ??????????? Wow,


I thought the officials were certain the First Officer made the last communication.



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 07:19 PM
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reply to post by steaming
 


They're saying that the pilot on the radio did exact what he was supposed to do. He signed off with Air Traffic Control, exactly how he was supposed to, and used the flight number. It was a late night flight, so he certainly wasn't going to say "Good afternoon".



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 09:22 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Stinks of a cover up this does, so they said the pilot originally signed off in a casual manner. Now they say he signed off correctly, covering up and attempting to avert people's interest in the captain and co-pilot maybe?

I fail to see how they could have gotten something like this wrong in the beginning, I mean surely the comms would have been one of the first things to be analysed to check for any signs.

Bet the families are going mental with all this.



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 09:31 PM
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Zaphod58
reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


And it changed nothing. Someone along the way left off the flight number, that's all.


I agree it changed nothing since it only reinforced the fact that absolutely nothing that has been stated by Malaysia is trustworthy. I will add though that I personally wouldn't discount it as no big deal - because that's a slippery slope when we accept such inconsistencies then the next thing they'll be saying oops, the pilot actually said a lot more but we simply left the information off the transcript, that's all...actually wait, what am I saying, they've sealed the transcript anyway, and pretty much anything else that's important. This investigation has been a real piece of work. 4th week and we are no closer or clearer about what happened than the first day. The only sure thing in this whole investigation has been disavowed claims and wild goose chases. I can't wait to see what it's going to be next. Perhaps new satellite data will suggest the flight path is an east - west corridor. I wish Malaysia would've just gone all out and said the last words from the cockpit were beam me up scotty.



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 09:32 PM
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reply to post by civpop
 


Casually, as in, "Good night". All pilots tend to be somewhat casual with ATC, and professional as hell when necessary.



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 09:36 PM
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reply to post by pejanene
 


This is nothing. You have to learn what to disregard and what to pay extra attention to with these investigations. Leaving off that he used the flight number, in information released to the public is nothing.

Where does it say that any investigative agency (or government) is required to release every single detail in an investigation, prior to a final report? In some incidents we're lucky to get any information at all.



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 09:37 PM
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I have noticed a "trickle trickle" of media references to the flight but by making comments about the captains relationship and sexual preference type aka gay comments, is this the start of a finger of blame being delibratley aired on msm against the softest target - the captain.



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 09:41 PM
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Im not on about the news channels by the way, im on about tv chat shows.



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 09:44 PM
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reply to post by UKGuy1805
 


It wouldn't be uncommon. Pilots frequently get the blame until someone points to something else.



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 09:52 PM
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Zaphod58
reply to post by pejanene
 


This is nothing. You have to learn what to disregard and what to pay extra attention to with these investigations. Leaving off that he used the flight number, in information released to the public is nothing.

Where does it say that any investigative agency (or government) is required to release every single detail in an investigation, prior to a final report? In some incidents we're lucky to get any information at all.


If it's nothing to you that's fine, but it doesn't therefore mean it's nothing. They trumped up the "casual" tone initially and now are reversing course, and to me that is simply continued proof to the fiasco that is this investigation and Malaysia's handling of it. Nothing to you, something to me. We'll have to agree to disagree.

To answer your question, there is no place that says any investigative agency or government is required to release every single detail in an investigation. Hope that helps.



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 09:55 PM
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reply to post by pejanene
 


Exactly. So while they appear incompetent on the surface, there is no telling what's going on in the background. Or for that matter who was pushing the initial "casual" remarks.



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 10:00 PM
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It was the First Officer and the original release was a translation someone made and even stated it might have inaccuracies.

Missing the flight number is pretty minor in this whole thing,

I suppose people are wanting to speculate the communication was not from a pilot because of the first release wording. Even if he was a pilot and left out the flight number it would not be the first time it has happened.

Or is it now that the captain is said to have communicated it.
edit on 3/31/2014 by roadgravel because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Yeah i wish they would lay off the pilots they are like gold dust in my eyes and certainly they are not responsible, dont know what/who but not the pilots.



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by roadgravel
 


Update in that I found this, which backs up what you are saying based on the interview you heard...


(REUTERS) - An Illinois judge on Monday dismissed a US law firm's motion to obtain evidence of possible design and manufacturing defects from Boeing Co and Malaysian Airline System in connection with the disappearance of flight MH370 three weeks earlier.

Cook County Judge Kathy Flanagan also threatened to impose sanctions against Ribbeck Law Chartered, citing previous instances where the Chicago-based law firm had "improperly brought" petitions, such as last year's Asiana Airlines plane crash in San Francisco.

"Despite these orders, the same law firm has proceeded, yet again, with the filing of the instant petition, knowing full well that there is no basis to do so," said Ms Flanagan.

"Should this law firm choose to do so, the court will impose sanctions on its own motion."



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 10:32 PM
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reply to post by roadgravel
 


Now, mixed reports about pilot or co-pilot with regards to last ATC/comprehensible transmission...perhaps they will be "bending" (more) soon for victims' families...I hope so...On a selfish note, I hate to see bad things happen to the B7xxs as I avoid airbuses like the plague...


KUALA LUMPUR - Malaysia's Department of Civil Aviation (DCA) has said the last words from the cockpit of missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 were "Good night Malaysian three seven zero".

"We would like to confirm that the last conversation in the transcript between the air traffic controller and the cockpit is at 0119 (Malaysian Time) and is "Good night Malaysian three seven zero," DCA said in a short statement issued on Monday night.

"The authorities are still doing forensic investigation to determine whether those last words from the cockpit were by the pilot or the co-pilot,'' said the statement.

It was reported earlier that the last words from the flight were "Alright, goodnight", spoken by co-pilot Fariq Abdul Hamid.

DCA said acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein "has instructed the investigating team to release the full transcript". It will be made available during the briefing to the next-of-kin of passengers on board the flight.


Source www.straitstimes.com...






edit on 31-3-2014 by BurningSpearess because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2014 @ 10:42 PM
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reply to post by civpop
 

Smells less like a cover-up to me, and more like common incompetence. Although, they still need to release all the audio for all the voice communication that occurred with this flight - not just the transcripts. They are either complete idiots for not releasing that yet, or just trying too hard to be "sensitive" to families of the flight-crew. Many people will no-doubt try to read-in all kinds of things into whatever the flight crew may have said on-air - but it will all get quickly debunked just as fast. So, they should just release the tapes already!




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