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Beijing-bound MAS plane carrying 239 people missing as of 20 mins ago.

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posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 12:40 AM
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WatchingFromtheShadows
We're all familiar with the below picture...



If we consider that information to be credible, then where could the plane have flown? While we all see the above pic, what we're not shown is where that alleged flight plan leads.



Yep, the US military base at Diego Garcia.

Is it possible that the plane was secretly hijacked by the US in order to gain access to certain people on the plane? Considering the flight was full of Chinese citizens, doing so would certainly be risky and could potentially serve as the catalyst for open war, but if the prize were great enough (defense contractors with game changing stealth tech knowledge), I wouldn't put it past our government to try something like this.

Just a thought.
edit on 13-3-2014 by WatchingFromtheShadows because: spelling


Thanks for the map.

Another theory could be the path was actually of a US jet returning to Diego Garcia after shooting down the plane. Would this be the closest base a US jet would take off or return to?




posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 12:42 AM
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reply to post by Daughter2
 


Highly doubt that. There are US bases in the Philippines.



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 12:44 AM
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I had a thought.... What if there was an EMP in the vicinity and it fried the plane's electrical system.

Is there any way to check sizemographs or whatever..... to see if there was infact an EMP.

could've been an excersize or something.. no?



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 12:46 AM
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Bilk22
reply to post by charlyv
 


That may be true, but from his explanation, it seems the data that's transmitted from the engine components are for use by the various manufacturers so they can diagnose systems while in operation. It doesn't appear to be critical to the flight operations. Basically it came off as, to make an analogy and maybe a poor analogy, what web sites do to track viewing habits so they can improve their marketing. The system he was talking about, he suggested, was to track efficiency and possibly diagnose inflight issues. Would that sort of interface need to be accessed from the cockpit?


Well it is basically not true. It would not matter if it was a bubble gum machine. Anything electrically connected to a commercial aircraft has to be terminated in a circuit breaker readily accessible to the flight crew. No exceptions.



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 12:46 AM
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roadgravel
I saw something stating Beijing plus 1 hour of fuel. (Didn't give lbs or vol) No idea if it is correct.


I don't know if were commenting on the same thing (sorry) but the earliest reports stated that at the time it lost communication with ATCs 1:30am, it had 7.5 hours of fuel left. I dunno how far 7.5 hours of fuel will take you...

Just putting it out there.



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 12:46 AM
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reply to post by Daughter2
 


Daughter2
Another theory could be the path was actually of a US jet returning to Diego Garcia after shooting down the plane. Would this be the closest base a US jet would take off or return to?

Okinawa maybe? or maybe some US forces stationed in South Korea. However, Diego Garcia would probably have the least "accountability" to any host country - since it's basically joint US/UK operation there with no civilian population at all.

Of course, I guess we can't rule-out some rouge group operating from the Lost Continent of Mu.


CORRECTION: I mispoke, that would be the Lost Continent of Lemuria (and/or "Kumari Kandam") in the Indian Ocean - not the Lost Continent of Mu which is in the Pacific Ocean.


edit on 2014-3-14 by EnhancedInterrogator because: Correction regarding proper lost continent.

edit on 2014-3-14 by EnhancedInterrogator because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 12:48 AM
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reply to post by pejanene
 


That spotting of a plane north of Pulau Perak is also likely attributed to another Beoing 777 flying in that same area and that approximate time (2:35 am versus the reported 2:40 am).

reply to post by combatmaster
 


Haven't they said that two different systems were shut off within 15 minutes of each other? An EMP should kill both things at once.



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 12:49 AM
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charlyv

Bilk22
reply to post by charlyv
 


That may be true, but from his explanation, it seems the data that's transmitted from the engine components are for use by the various manufacturers so they can diagnose systems while in operation. It doesn't appear to be critical to the flight operations. Basically it came off as, to make an analogy and maybe a poor analogy, what web sites do to track viewing habits so they can improve their marketing. The system he was talking about, he suggested, was to track efficiency and possibly diagnose inflight issues. Would that sort of interface need to be accessed from the cockpit?


Well it is basically not true. It would not matter if it was a bubble gum machine. Anything electrically connected to a commercial aircraft has to be terminated in a circuit breaker readily accessible to the flight crew. No exceptions.
Ok I trust what you're saying. Like I stated, the way he explained it was this system wasn't part of the operations for the plane. It was more for the manufacturers to gather data on operational flights.



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 12:49 AM
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pejanene
reply to post by Daughter2
 


Highly doubt that. There are US bases in the Philippines.


There's rumored to be an American secret base in Mindanao, Philippines. Don't know if its true though.

Does anyone know what they do in Diego Garcia? Is it the Area 51 this side of the world?



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 12:52 AM
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IQPREREQUISITE

pejanene
reply to post by Daughter2
 


Highly doubt that. There are US bases in the Philippines.


There's rumored to be an American secret base in Mindanao, Philippines. Don't know if its true though.

Does anyone know what they do in Diego Garcia? Is it the Area 51 this side of the world?
Long range bombers.



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 12:52 AM
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Bilk22

charlyv

Bilk22
reply to post by charlyv
 


That may be true, but from his explanation, it seems the data that's transmitted from the engine components are for use by the various manufacturers so they can diagnose systems while in operation. It doesn't appear to be critical to the flight operations. Basically it came off as, to make an analogy and maybe a poor analogy, what web sites do to track viewing habits so they can improve their marketing. The system he was talking about, he suggested, was to track efficiency and possibly diagnose inflight issues. Would that sort of interface need to be accessed from the cockpit?


Well it is basically not true. It would not matter if it was a bubble gum machine. Anything electrically connected to a commercial aircraft has to be terminated in a circuit breaker readily accessible to the flight crew. No exceptions.
Ok I trust what you're saying. Like I stated, the way he explained it was this system wasn't part of the operations for the plane. It was more for the manufacturers to gather data on operational flights.


Again, sorry for ad nauseum, if something is connected electrically to an aircraft, it IS part of the operations of the plane, just by the fact that it is tied into it's electrical system. It is a strict and fundamental rule.



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 12:53 AM
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reply to post by IQPREREQUISITE
 


IQPREREQUISITE
Does anyone know what they do in Diego Garcia? Is it the Area 51 this side of the world?

Honestly, most of it is probably mundane.

  • Lay-over point, refueling for transport aircraft.
  • Lay-over point, refueling and re-arming bombers (lots of pics available of B52's back in the day, and B1's and B2's there).
  • Refueling and re-supply base for Naval operations in the region.
  • "Alleged" black-site for "Extraordinary Rendition" and "Enhanced Interrogation".



edit on 2014-3-14 by EnhancedInterrogator because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 01:00 AM
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EnhancedInterrogator
reply to post by IQPREREQUISITE
 


IQPREREQUISITE
Does anyone know what they do in Diego Garcia? Is it the Area 51 this side of the world?

Honestly, most of it is probably mundane.

  • Lay-over point, refueling for transport aircraft.
  • Lay-over point, refueling and re-arming bombers (lots of pics available of B52's back in the day, and B1's and B2's there).
  • Refueling and re-supply base for Naval operations in the region.
  • "Alleged" black-site for "Extraordinary Rendition" and "Enhanced Interrogation".



edit on 2014-3-14 by EnhancedInterrogator because: (no reason given)


"Extraordinary Rendition"...that grabbed my attention.

20 Chinese techs...a base allegedly doing black ops...but is the U.S. THAT bold to think of such things? I dunno...seems pretty impractical to me. But the rendition part gets you to think somehow...



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 01:12 AM
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reply to post by Bilk22
 


I've read every page of this thread and out of all of this I still have only one main question: Why do you continue to believe this plane is in China? Is this fact? No. So quit stating it as so and say it is your theory. Preferably state that it is your theory that you've been stuck on ever since you got hung up on the flight being in Nanming and then it being stated as false information.

You have twisted everything that has happened since then to fit your belief instead of being open-minded to facts and reasonable conjecture. I don't see how you being extremely hardheaded about this furthers the thread and quite frankly takes away from people here trying to find out info and come up with reasonable hypothesis. Muddying already muddy waters.

Again, please just look at it from more than just you wanting to be right.

Thank you.
edit on 3/14/2014 by ThePawnsTheory because: added to



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 01:22 AM
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Anything electrically connected to a commercial aircraft has to be terminated in a circuit breaker readily accessible to the flight crew. No exceptions.


Working in the aircraft maintenance for a big company I can tell that this is true and false at the same time. It is true that every system in an aircraft is connected to an electrical bus with a circuit breaker that is nothing more than a normal fuse like in your home (just a bit better and other design). But it is not true that all these systems are readily accessible to the flight crew. In all modern aircrafts you try to minimize distraction in the cockpit an remove everything not needed for the crew. So all the circuit breakers that aren't relevant for in flight safety are located in the E&E compartment or in the device itself.

As this maintenance system is a just a add on that isn't really needed for a safe flight there is no need to give the crew a circuit breaker for it. If this device has a malfunction /short circuit the CB will pop and it has to be fixed on the ground. If the crew has a major problem and would like to kill all the extra stuff they don't pop 100 CBs for all those devices but the 1 to disconnect the whole electrical bus. There are more buses so you can still have all flight relevant systems powered but disconnect all the unnecessary stuff like light / entertainment systems...

Edit to add: And we are even producing some systems that have fuses inside to protect the whole device from going of if just one module short circuits. There would still be a main circuit breaker to switch off the device but additional fuses inside the case so that everything else is working if just one sub-circuit goes off.
edit on 1394778371326xMarchE by UnixFE because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 01:22 AM
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Here is some Breaking News for you folks.


"Seafloor event" possibly linked to MH370: Chinese researchers


Let you read it for yourselves

LINK



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 01:24 AM
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EnhancedInterrogator

Honestly, most of it is probably mundane.

  • Lay-over point, refueling for transport aircraft.
  • Lay-over point, refueling and re-arming bombers (lots of pics available of B52's back in the day, and B1's and B2's there).
  • Refueling and re-supply base for Naval operations in the region.
  • "Alleged" black-site for "Extraordinary Rendition" and "Enhanced Interrogation".



Hold the phone Nancy Reagan! That last line in the list... do you have links/sources?



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 01:25 AM
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roadgravel
I saw something stating Beijing plus 1 hour of fuel. (Didn't give lbs or vol) No idea if it is correct.

I saw on the pilots forum (see link below) that 2 hours was the standard but the pilot(?) could ask for more if necessary

Various bits and pieces in case they have not been put on this thread...

Arbitrageur

They said there were no more data transmissions from ACARS.
But do we know for sure that is the means (and the only means) by which Rolls Royce can retrieve data? I don't know.

From about page 133 on the pilots forum there is plenty of information about the method and a discussion on the engine data. Really this forum is very useful and I think folks should read it as well as ATS to get a better picture of what pilots think is happening. Some mild speculations there as well.

nitpicker330

Engine/ACARS data is via VHF or Satcom datalink connection.
Only some are using HF data connections in the polar regions where Satcom is not reliable.



Missing Malaysia plane not subject to new FAA directive: Boeing
English.news.cn 2014-03-14 05:39:05

Meanwhile, Laura Brown, deputy assistant administrator for public affairs of the FAA, also denied the possibility that the accident may be linked to the "cracking and corrosion" problem. "This (AD) applies only to U.S. registered aircraft," Brown told Xinhua. "The civil aviation authorities in other countries usually issue identical or similar directives that apply to aircraft registered in their countries."

The directive, first drawn up on Sept. 26, 2013, was approved on Feb. 18 and published in the U.S. Federal Register on March 5. It's due to take effect on April 9. In the notice, the FAA said one operator had reported a 16-inch (40.6-centimeter) crack under the 3-bay SATCOM antenna adapter plate in the crown skin of the fuselage on an airplane that was 14 years old with approximately 14,000 total flight cycles.

It said following the crack finding, the same operator inspected 42 other airplanes that are between 6 and 16 years old and "found some local corrosion, but no other cracking."

Early Thursday, the Wall Street Journal quoted sources as saying that the missing plane may have kept flying for four hours after its last contact. The Malaysian authorities described the report as being "inaccurate."

Contacted by Xinhua, Boeing said it has no response to the report. "Because the Malaysian authorities are leading the investigation, this inquiry should be directed to them." the spokesman said.

Boeing, being a defence contractor would probably know to keep quiet about anything until official releases of information.

Search for missing Malaysia airplane may expand to Indian Ocean: White House
English.news.cn 2014-03-14 05:41:20


WASHINGTON, March 13 (Xinhua) -- The White House on Thursday said that search for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 might be expanding to the Indian Ocean based on new but inconclusive information about the aircraft.

The United States and the international community are following all possible leads to locate the missing aircraft, the White House Press Secretary Jay Carney told reporters at a press briefing.

"And it is my understanding that one possible piece of information or collection -- pieces of information has led to the possibility that a new area -- a search area may be opened in the India Ocean," he said, adding that "but I don't have any more details on that."


I picked up somewhere that the cockpit has its own separate oxygen supply in case of depressurisation or contamination and also the pinger on the black box would not reach very far underwater, but I guess that the US navy have pretty sensitive equipment these days.


edit on 14 Mar 2014 by qmantoo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 01:26 AM
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reply to post by ThePawnsTheory

ThePawnsTheory
...Why do you continue to believe this plane is in China?

Actually, I personally do not.

If it had been "known" to have made it into Chinese air-space before going dark, then I might entertain something shady on China's part.

But, even then, I would be more inclined to think either:

  • The Chinese military shot it down "mistakenly" (like the Soviets did to Korean Air Lines Flight 007 back in 1983).
  • Or perhaps some accidental mid-air collision (like what happened back in 2001 when one of their interceptor's had a mid-air collision with on of our military "reconnaissance" planes).



edit on 2014-3-14 by EnhancedInterrogator because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2014 @ 01:29 AM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


It could be. I'm more curious as to whether or not it is true that the ping can't be read (or doesnt work at all) if it is underwater. If it can't how did the US come to the idea that it is underwater in the Indian Ocean?

Again, I've taken in a lot of info the last few days and have learned (or have tried to learn) a lot so I could be confused. haha



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