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A vast hidden surveillance network runs across America

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posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 04:15 AM
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Then theres Tripwire which surviels all the national parks and monuments 24/7




posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 06:08 AM
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Old news. STS 101Atlantis deposited the new version KH-9 HEXAGON spy satellite in 2007 (the exact mission is still classified) that began the era of satellite based/global positioning ground surveillance. Most of it's work has been taken over by drones as it's has became somewhat obsolete. The ESA will launch a new CIA satellite(reportedly an armed version of the hexagon-the first ever) sometime this summer.

A new kind of orbit(other than geocentrically aligned) has been tested although no one has the slightest idea what it means as far as ground survallence.



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by hounddoghowlie
 


Looks like I stand corrected. But I have had an Leo tell me one of the reasons its because of what I mentioned in the previous post. The guy told me that the newer cars don't give as good a radar return and made it more difficult to get accurate readings. The reflective plates helped make the cars radar return much easier for the radar gun to pickup.

I'm not even sure if reflectivity even makes a difference to radar. But that's what a cop told me once. But it did come from a cop so it could already have been an ignorance laced statement he made.



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 04:04 PM
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reply to post by BASSPLYR
 


i'm not sure about reflective paint returning radar signal. seeing how they are radio waves, i do know that they make coating/ paint to absorb the waves. i would think that it it tend to scatter the signal. now on a laser known as LIDAR it might work.

edit on 7-3-2014 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)


ETA: look here i found this.


1. Aiming: The police officer aims the LiDAR "cross-hairs" through a telescopic monocular (usually a 2X - 8X monocular scope depending on model) built into the LiDAR gun. The scope allows the police officer to see the target vehicle before the target vehicle operator sees the police officer generally at a distance of 1000 ft and up to 4000 ft. The police officer is trained to aim the pulsed 4 milliradian cone of the laser at the license plate. Licence plates have been coated with a retroreflective coating designed to create a 4 milliradian return reflection (back to the police officer's LIDAR gun receiver aperture). Range varies by LiDAR gun manufacturer, target vehicle aim-point reflectivity, and weather conditions (temperature and humidity, precipitation). LiDAR speed measurement can be recorded by the LiDAR unit anywhere from ~5 feet to ~4,000 feet. Most police Lidar units actually use a magnification of 2X. The use of a laser with an 8X magnification scope would make acquiring and tracking a quickly moving vehicle problematic at best.
LIDAR Speed Gun




1. Best reflector: Front/rear license plate. This has a highly reflective retro-reflective coating designed to match the 4 milliradian cone angle of the police LiDAR units and return that beam back to the point of origin (the police LiDAR receiving aperture). For motorcycles or states where front license plates are not required police are trained to aim at the headlight (see #2 below) or chrome grill work. Most states use 3M(tm) retroreflective surfaces on their license plates that are specifically designed to ease LiDAR speed detection of your vehicle.[5]


now i did know that 3m made the first reflective coatings for plates. i didn't know that they were making it especially for lidar. i have to check into that, i'd like to know.

it would seem that your right. my bad

edit on 7-3-2014 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)


i've been nosing around and most of the pages i find say that radar is more common than lidar, don't know lets just we're both right.
still gona look for 3m making the reflective coating. i found where thay brag about making the coating for 70 years. but so far nothing on changing it.
edit on 7-3-2014 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 06:48 PM
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Reminds me of this movie.

edit on 7-3-2014 by Arolexion because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 07:48 PM
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saidative
Wow, this surveilance stuff is coming on so fast!

I don't know how paranoid I'm being, but I just started trying to keep the built-in cam lense on my lap-top covered.

I can never seem to always keep it covered, though. I know probably no one's looking, but you know they probably recording some people like that. lol... idk.. sux


A bit of sellotape and a bit of paper will work. You're not the only one. I've done the same with my mobile phone.

The other things are that plugging a mobile phone into a PC can allow the phone to suck data and send it goodness knows where. With my old ZTE phone, if I plugged it into the USB port of my laptop, it would actually change the internet routing table of the PC and send all traffic across the mobile phone network. So I only recharge the phone using USB ports on my TV or the power line.



posted on Mar, 7 2014 @ 07:52 PM
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Umm right , DMV ?



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 07:41 AM
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yet one more use for a high powered laser.

its illegal to shine a laser at:

1) a person
2) a manned aerial vehicle


no laws yet on inanimate public objects....such as expensive repo cameras.


good luck and happy hunting



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 07:54 AM
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Heh lasors are good for some urban destruction.

Anyway, in the UK Government Communications Headquarters [GCHQ]

Is built on top of the UK's Contnental Fibre Optic Cable

Hard to compete with that eh. I certainly dont have a spare couble of hundred million dollars to lay down my fibre optic hyper network
edit on 8-3-2014 by Bellor because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 07:57 AM
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Here's a boring solution: Pay your bills.

People decry the lack of available credit, or the cost of debt while at the same time throw their arms up when the company that lent you the money have the audacity to want you to pay it back. The lack of available credit and the cost of loans is associated with the risk. Catching deadbeats is a good thing.



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 08:00 AM
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Unless you are driving a stolen car or have stolen plates you don't have anything to worry about, that is unless you are very paranoid.

Well you can thank the great people of the UK for this system, which has been around since the late 70's.


ANPR was invented in 1976 at the Police Scientific Development Branch in the UK[citation needed]. Prototype systems were working by 1979, and contracts were let to produce industrial systems, first at EMI Electronics, and then at Computer Recognition Systems (CRS) in Wokingham, UK. Early trial systems were deployed on the A1 road and at the Dartford Tunnel. However it did not become widely used until new developments in cheaper and easier to use software was pioneered during the 1990s. The first arrest through detection of a stolen car was made in 1981[citation needed] and the first documented case of ANPR in helping solve a murder occurred in November 2005 after the murder of Sharon Beshenivsky, in which City of Bradford based ANPR played a vital role in locating and subsequently convicting her killers.[4]


en.wikipedia.org...

Again unless your breaking the law why does it bother you that the police are using this to help catch those posing threats to you and your safety?



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 08:02 AM
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reply to post by freakjive
 


cctv is everywhere. They use public bins in some parts of AU to conceal the cameras.
Nobody seems to mind, cos they feel safer... *cough



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 08:13 AM
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reply to post by tsurfer2000h
 


Because the people in control of that sort of infrastructure seem to be at best very amoral people who seem to majorly benefit themselves by subjugation of the masses through labour.

So, some people aware enough to realise that may indeed be avery bad thing often using both history and current events to raise rational concerns
edit on 8-3-2014 by Bellor because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-3-2014 by Bellor because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 08:16 AM
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Bellor
reply to post by tsurfer2000h
 


Because the people in control of that sort of infrastructure seem to be at best very amoral people who seem to majorly benefit themselves by subjugation of the masses through labour.

So, some people aware enough to realise that may indeed be avery bad thing often using both en.wikipedia.org... and current events to raise rational concerns
edit on 8-3-2014 by Bellor because: (no reason given)


So then don't borrow money from those amoral people who are out to subjugate you by agreeing to lend you money.



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 08:24 AM
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reply to post by Bellor
 





Because the people in control of that sort of infrastructure seem to be at best very amoral people who seem to majorly benefit themselves by subjugation of the masses through labour.


Question for you...

Do you know anyone that has been detained because of one of these devices?

Maybe two questions...

How can you make that assumption about those using this type of technology, unless you know all of those who use this technology?



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 08:40 AM
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reply to post by Leonidas
 


Personaly I do not take part of the debt based economy. However It should be stressed regardless of debt nothing is free. So you know.

reply to post by tsurfer2000h
 


Your very own source answers your first question as it states the details of the first arrest when deployed.

I look to those in the public forum, our elected officials, im sure google could quickly compile in long order a database of articles on local corruption and abuses of surveillance technology in and around the country for some time. Most likely collusion of local councils acting as proxy between private business interests and those in Parliament. Im sure it is just total happenstance however that more often than not the interests of both government and private business just happens to be the same, often to the detriment of the people. But dont worry, im sure despite all that goes with power they have the peoples interest at heart, LOL.



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 08:56 AM
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reply to post by Bellor
 





Your very own source answers your first question as it states the details of the first arrest when deployed.


Did you actually pay attention to what it said?


The first arrest through detection of a stolen car was made in 1981[citation needed] and the first documented case of ANPR in helping solve a murder occurred in November 2005 after the murder of Sharon Beshenivsky, in which City of Bradford based ANPR played a vital role in locating and subsequently convicting her killers.[4]


Notice the part where it was because this technology found a stolen car which in turn became a murder case.

This was not some innocent person driving their own car that was stopped, which is what paranoid people think this technology is being used for.



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 09:39 AM
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reply to post by tsurfer2000h
 


I paid as much attention to it as I was required to by the question you asked. Seemed pretty self explanatory.

Please understand the ethical conundrums behind concepts such as Electronic police state. The adverse effects of such a state on society is not just measured in however many private individuals are kidnapped by the government but also in how such a system can be used to dangerously coerce a society into a way of being that may not entirely be the will of the people, effectively side stepping any democratic process.

With regards to the technology you mention though.

The laughing policemen: 'Inaccurate' data boosts arrest rate


Police are using controversial car-surveillance technology aimed at catching criminals and terrorists to target members of the public in order to meet government performance targets and raise revenue,


As I said earlier it is not hard to find abuses of this technology and those cameras are really just meant for cars.

You personaly could believe in a police state, ethicaly if you can justify that in your own mind, thats cool, thats up to you, there might even be some commies under my bed, I dunno but I do not believe this technology in anyway is for our own benefit.
edit on 8-3-2014 by Bellor because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-3-2014 by Bellor because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 09:45 AM
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reply to post by Bellor
 





You personaly could believe a police state, ethicaly if you can justify that in your own mind, thats cool, thats up to you, there might even be some commies under my bed, I dunno but I do not believe this technology in anyway is for our own benefit.


Well then if your car is ever stolen make sure to tell them not to use this technology since you feel it will not benefit you in any way.



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 09:53 AM
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reply to post by tsurfer2000h
 


Meh, that does not make any sense, I have never said it should not be used, its a useful technology, much like the internet.

The point is the people who are in charge of that technology and what else it is used for, as I said before, if you support the police state, thats cool, I find that way of thinking to be the complete opposite of how things should be, but thats just me.

You may find this style of government appealing, fairly interesting concept.

Night-watchman state


A night-watchman state, or a minimal state, is variously defined by sources. In the strictest sense, it is a form of government in political philosophy where the state's only legitimate function is the protection of individuals from assault, theft, breach of contract, and fraud, and the only legitimate governmental institutions are the military, police, and courts



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