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The New "Wow!" Signal - SETI's Recent Close Encounter With An Unidentified Emission

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posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 02:45 PM
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Just a postulation, but IF its intelligent, would not a one time "blip" indicate a space faring race, at least at our level of tech.

Because if its intelligent and able to admit radio signals, Id assume the planet like ours would be awash with them, so perhaps a probe or satellite moving through that system, OR a vehicle.

Or it could just be a random emission, but still pretty cool.




posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 02:58 PM
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Checked a sample from the HabCat, which, it says, is intended to show what sorts of data it contains. I found Hipparcos numbers, Right Ascension, Declination, V band magnitude (Johnson), parallax, parallax standard error, B-V color index, B-V color index standard error, Double and Multiple star catalog numbers (CCDM), HD catalog numbers, and BD catalog names.
I found no indication that radial velocity data is included. Given the number of stars out to 11th magnitude, I wonder now if the radial velocity of TYC 1220-91-1 has been measured. If not, it certainly should be.
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edit on 2-3-2014 by Ross 54 because: added information, corrected spelling

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posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 03:11 PM
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LABTECH767
reply to post by JadeStar
 


You never fail to impress, this is a terrific thread you have started, Do you by any chance remember the other signal from the 1970's when the noise was regared as nothing but random static but an absent minced intern sat there with his pen Joining the dot's litterally on the binary print out and ended up with an image of a stick man with a triangular head and in and three fingered hands standing in front of what looked like a radio satellite dish, it was one of those which used to be fairly well known but I can find nothing on it on the net.

Anyway The real difficulty is attenuation as you know and even a hundred arecibo sized dishes would be luck to pick anything more than a few light years away up unless the transmitters use an incredibly powerful signal on the order of stella magnitude in amplitude of signal and if we ever do detect someone it will likely be someone no more advanced than us as more advanced civilizations may have developed other form's of communication.

edit on 2-3-2014 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)


Do you mean the Aricebo radio transmission?

www.bigear.org...



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 03:11 PM
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reply to post by JadeStar
 


Thanks for the links!!! S&F.



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by JadeStar
 


All i can say is Wow!

Finally somewhere to direct our future interstellar probes and craft, now if only we had some exotic matter and a working Alcubierre drive!

edit on 2-3-2014 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 03:42 PM
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JadeStarHowever, a sufficiently equipped amateur radio astronomer with a big enough dish could perhaps do nothing but look for a repeat of that signal from the vicinity of that star and if the stars aligned (to use a pun) perhaps make the discovery of the ages.
So, girl with a scope and a whole lotta hope, are you one such sufficiently equipped amateur radio astronomer?


I guess everyone loves pi.
edit on 2-3-2014 by reject because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 04:53 PM
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That's kind of neat, I'm surprised I didn't hear about it back when it was picked up.

But to think, even though it's technically feasible to transmit across 100LY with existing technology, it's still quite a crap shoot. This is because an Aricebo-style transmitter will have to focus a fairly narrow beam to reach out that far. Thing is, it has to sweep across the orbit of the planet you're intending to broadcast to. (Or at least the part of the orbit where the planet is.) If you don't know the target planet's orbital period around it's parent star and how far ahead of the planet to aim your beam for an intercept, it's going to be difficult if not impossible to repeat hitting that planet with a tightly aimed signal beam.

However if you combine targeted narrow beam broadcasts with something like a Kepler-style planet finder, then you can greatly improve your odds of getting a signal to your intended target. Because with optical observations, you can predict where the planet should be by the time your signal would reach it. And that's with the technology we have now. In theory another alien civ in the same stage of tech we're at might be able to get a message to us provided they're within 100LY and willing to transmit.



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 06:00 PM
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Using the frequency of 4462 MHz, the Arecibo facility should have a beam width of about 3/4 of an arc minute. 100 light years out, that should have spread to around 90 billion miles wide. This should be more than wide enough to cover all positions of a planet in the habitable zone of a G class star, all at once.



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 06:09 PM
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reply to post by MadHatter364
 


What incredibly pessimistic way of thinking. By the time we could develop such devices, we could be dead... (using your logic of course).

Humans need to continue searching, despite the factor of propogation delay. To give up searching over such a small way of thinking such as "there's no point if we can't gain anything NOW", would truly halt advancement.

Why bother saving money if i can't have it now? Until i find a quicker means of obtaining money, i will not bother saving. THAT is your thinking.



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 06:10 PM
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MadHatter364
This just goes to show how lousy our kind of communication devices are, I mean if that had been PROOF of an alien civilization living there, then our response would take 100 years to be heard... By then they could all already be dead...

What we need is some kind of "quantum intercom" that allows information to get from point A(us) to point B(aliens) in zero time.
Until we have such a technology there isn't even a point in looking for ETs... :/


What incredibly pessimistic way of thinking. By the time we could develop such devices, we could be dead... (using your logic of course).

Humans need to continue searching, despite the factor of propogation delay. To give up searching over such a small way of thinking such as "there's no point if we can't gain anything NOW", would truly halt advancement.

Why bother saving money if i can't have it now? Until i find a quicker means of obtaining money, i will not bother saving. THAT is your thinking.


EDIT: Let me give you an example. Obtaining a 200 year old signal (Hypothetically) could still provide us with way more answers than we had originally. What's the point of receiving sent information in real time when we don't even understand any of it?
edit on 2-3-2014 by xxdaniel21 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 07:12 PM
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Arecibo is 100 light years away? You said it. Where do you live? It's only 1408 miles from me. LOL I swear it's in the OP.

Arecibo at 100 light years away could be detected by a similar set up as the Allen Telescope Array.

I've even been there I went swimming in a mountain river in Arecibo while visiting Ponce Puerto Rico
edit on PMu31u0330916312014-03-02T19:16:09-06:00 by AutumnWitch657 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 07:20 PM
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as JadeStar pointed out not all signals from ET civilizations would be deliberate attempts at communication. her example was radar astronomy which from time to time is aligned right to come our way.

in addition to that experiments might produce and RF or other spectrum bursts. and so would certain types of propulsion system beginning with certain types ion or plasma drives going on through pulsed fission or fusion to antimatter drives (even if merely used as an advanced form of rocket) to even more advanced space drives which would mimic stellar sources or galactic sources by producing x ray or gamma ray bursts or micro lensing events or chernekov radiation.

a focused exhaust stream from an advanced rocket might even somewhat resemble a laser beam. any relativistic rocket would (by the Kzinti Lesson from the Larry Niven: Known Space series) also make a heck of a particle or laser beam weapon.

The below excerpt is from the ProjectRho website at www.projectrho.com...


The Kzinti Lesson:

A reaction drive's efficiency as a weapon is in direct proportion to its efficiency as a drive.

The warlike Kzinti invaded the solar system, figuring that humanity would be a pushover since the pacifist humans of the time had no weapons. Humans showed the Kzin the error of their ways by annihilating Kzinti warships with laser arrays used for solar sails, multi-million degree fusion exhausts, and photon drives that were basically titanic lasers. So keep in mind that the higher the exhaust velocities of the rocket engine, the more damage it will do to anything unfortunate enough to be in the path of the exhaust.

Having said that, realize that as a general rule propulsion exhaust is poorly collimated*, which means after a very short range it will have expanded and dissipated into harmlessness.


*EDIT: a beamed core system would be an exception to poor collimation. And any advanced rocket that uses an optimized magnetic nozzle would by default have to be at least somewhat collimated.

these certainly would not be attempts at communication but certainly would prove ET civilization exists.
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posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 07:29 PM
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reply to post by stormbringer1701
 


Wow...
Yep I said it.
Wow.
I know your post was in English but I didn't understand one thing.



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 07:53 PM
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AutumnWitch657
reply to post by stormbringer1701
 


Wow...
Yep I said it.
Wow.
I know your post was in English but I didn't understand one thing.


the exhaust or other effects from an advanced civilization's normal space traffic and activities might produce signatures that could be used as strong evidence for the existence of ET civilizations. these signatures are within our current scientific and technical ability to detect and analyze.
edit on 2-3-2014 by stormbringer1701 because: typos



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 09:38 PM
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I can't believe no one's posted this yet!:




posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 10:33 PM
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AutumnWitch657
reply to post by stormbringer1701
 


Wow...
Yep I said it.
Wow.
I know your post was in English but I didn't understand one thing.


Basically:

There are many, many things that transmit electromagnetic energy: Radio, Radar, Television, Light, Nuclear Reactions, etc.

If they are big and powerful enough, we can detect them with our current technology, but they are more of a random thing in most cases (your local TV station or radio station does not transmit with a huge amount of power, as your TV or radio is not that far from it, and as such, would be too hard for us to detect for many light years away).

On the other hand, if you have a very, very, very sensitive receiver, you may pick up things that normally would not be detected.

The main idea though is: there are a HUGE amount of things that "transmit" and depending on what you are looking for, you just might see it.



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 10:45 PM
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This does merit a WOW, as does your speculation on what it may be and why it may not be repeated.

Autumnwitch657 your reading comprehension skills are severely limited if you believe jadestar was saying arecibo is 100 light years away. She was providing a good example of how our current tech can be detected 100 light years away. It was also an example that had nothing to do with trying to communicate.

Although could something like arecibo be used to send messages. If it could be detected 100 light years away could we use it or something like it to send actual messages?



posted on Mar, 3 2014 @ 12:42 AM
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inquisitive1977
This does merit a WOW, as does your speculation on what it may be and why it may not be repeated.

Autumnwitch657 your reading comprehension skills are severely limited if you believe jadestar was saying arecibo is 100 light years away. She was providing a good example of how our current tech can be detected 100 light years away. It was also an example that had nothing to do with trying to communicate.

Although could something like arecibo be used to send messages. If it could be detected 100 light years away could we use it or something like it to send actual messages?



Yes and it has been used for that on three separate occasions, most famously in 1974:



I am working on a video about intentional messages we've sent from various spots on Earth over the last 52 years. Look for it before the end of the month. I'll post it here or in Science and Technology.

Here's a more general video on the research conducted at Arecibo:


edit on 3-3-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2014 @ 12:55 AM
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signalfire
I can't believe no one's posted this yet!:



My inspiration!


True story, I read the book when I was in 5th grade and became inspired.
edit on 3-3-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2014 @ 01:04 AM
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edit on 3-3-2014 by 3u40r15m because: nxt..



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