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Chainsawing awkward trees

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posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 12:52 PM
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Two different styles and ways of getting the tree down.



The first video is very challenging compared to the second.




posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 01:17 PM
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The guy in that first video... Had me sitting on the edge of my chair from the time he made the first kerf. He clearly was clueless. There's no absolutely safe way to do something like that, I guess, but there are things that one can do to make it safer. He was not doing them.

Much more challenging when you're doing it close to structures or in a densely wooded area, but getting out of the way of the thing as it falls is critical, regardless of where you're cutting it.

I'll have to study these closely. I have a really "awkard" tree out by my stables that needs to be brought down before it comes down of its own accord ... on top of the stables.

On of the most useful posts I've seen on this website, BTW.
edit on 28-2-2014 by incoserv because: I could.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 01:32 PM
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reply to post by WatchRider
 


the " star " of your first vid - is an idiot



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 01:43 PM
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I've cut my share of trees. My system is different than the second guys a little but he does a good job at telling how to do it. I rarely use the wedge, only if something is going to bind the saw. I usually keep a higher angle on the backside.

Boy the saw is dull in the first video. I think the guy was trying to make the saw get left, his cuts were way off. It almost looks like he was trying to make it do that, with the attachment of the cable and chain. I have had trees do strange things after cutting them, mostly with hanging up in other trees. Those little branches on another tall tree can be a nightmare, the tree doesn't have much momentum and a little branch can keep the tree from falling way up there.

I had about forty inches of 8 inch diameter tree hanging from a couple of little branches way up there. It was just hanging in the air, I was swinging the tree after I cut chunks off the bottom trying to get it to fall. I got the tractor and a chain and pulled it loose, it came crashing down. I can't figure how a couple of half inch branches could hold up about four hundred pounds of wood. Oh well, no stranger things have happened.

Cutting trees is dangerous. Lots of experienced loggers get hurt or killed every year. It's good to learn from someone who has cut trees before. I've had the saw kick back a couple of times pretty bad. you need the strength to hold it along with the knowledge to know how to control it.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 01:50 PM
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ignorant_ape
reply to post by WatchRider
 


the " star " of your first vid - is an idiot



And I'm just sure that you're the chainsaw king eh?


He's not perfect, but get's the job done without killing himself or others.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by WatchRider
 


I agree with ignorant_ape.
That guy definitely never learned proper cutting techniques and doesn't even wear mandatory protection gear.
If he did this here he'd instantly lose his cutting license.

eta*: Inb4 "safety regulations and quality assurance = communism!"
edit on 28-2-2014 by ColCurious because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by WatchRider
 


You simply go to the side you want it to fall. Cut your small pie shape piece out there. Then go to the opposite side and cut through to it. The tree will fall that way every single time. That is unless it is rotten, then all bets are off lol.

The Bot



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 09:16 PM
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dlbott
reply to post by WatchRider
 


You simply go to the side you want it to fall. Cut your small pie shape piece out there. Then go to the opposite side and cut through to it. The tree will fall that way every single time. That is unless it is rotten, then all bets are off lol.

The Bot


I hear you but there's other factors like lean, branch-bias and wind etc as well.



posted on Mar, 1 2014 @ 04:47 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


I had exactly that same situation about two hours ago today. I had a cable and pulley setup with my tractor pulling the tree in the desired way but the damned thing wouldn't fall. After enlarging my cuts three times, I looked up and saw that it had shifted enough to engaged the other tree to keep from falling as expected. I had failed to notice that as I started. I finally had to move my pulley and cable to another tree to the shift the fall several degrees.

Yes, the first guy definitely had a dull blade that made the process longer and added to his consternation of getting it to fall. I will give him credit for not working himself to a frazzle in the process. One of my constant problems is using my heavy 20' saw beyond the time where I should be taking a long break. My learning experience in that regard was ruining two pairs of jeans by the chain skimming my leg twice over the years--jeans only damaged. The last time it caused me to buy a pair of chainsaw chaps.

The standard way they cut trees in this area is to make the back cut a little higher than the notched side. That provides a step in the back that will help the tree from kicking back if you have somewhat incorrectly gauged how it would fall.

Edit: I would like to add that the second guy with his small tree had a far easier job and location than the first.
edit on 1-3-2014 by Aliensun because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2014 @ 05:01 PM
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first thing
well adjusted saw and sharp blade
a dull blade will get you...no revs when you need them will get you too


keep your chain and blade tip lubed and have an eye to make sure your chain tension is right

no matter what type of cut
like a knife, if you have to force it, you are asking for trouble...

you also have to watch for widow makers falling down, and the butt of the tree kicking out...
to prevent kick outs you leave a last little bit of fiber at the end as you do your final cut
so the tree twists itself a little to break that last little connection as it starts to fall...
keeps the but over the stump for a fraction and gives a little time to step clear

i have a vice for the saw blade...on a small board
i sit on the board beside the blade in the vice...and give each tooth an equal amount of file stokes...


never cut alone

Last thing: a good arbourist has insurance and can cut more wood in a day then you can haul, and split, and pile, in a week with two guys. They can be worth the buck...if its a tricky tree
Or you want your bush to grow nice and healthy, they know how to choose the right trees to drop


edit on 1-3-2014 by Danbones because: (no reason given)

edit on 1-3-2014 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 12:45 AM
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WatchRider

ignorant_ape
reply to post by WatchRider
 


the " star " of your first vid - is an idiot



And I'm just sure that you're the chainsaw king eh?


He's not perfect, but get's the job done without killing himself or others.


I don't am not claiming to be a "chainsaw king" but the first guy did everything wrong and is lucky he didn't hurt or kill someone!

I was a foreman and worked for Asplundh tree experts for 15 years and have cut down more thousands of trees including small ones, extremely large ones, live tree's, dead ones and everything in between. If you don't know what your doing you can get someone killed pretty quick.

Most people have no clue what kind of weight your messing with when dropping a tree or even a large branch for that matter. There is a right way to make the cut and a wrong way. The guy in the first video was nowhere close to the right way. The fact that he had to abandon the saw and run clearly proves that.

For the most part, unless you rope the tree and physically pull it over a tree will naturally want to fall a certain direction when cut. You can finesse it depending on how you make the cut and with ropes but you can only do so much. You also have to factor in if it's live or dead and very importantly the wind. Even a dead tree like in video #1 catches an unbelievable amout of wind and HUGELY affects the outcome.

I have seen guys try to fell a large tree the "wrong direction" and snap 4-5 ropes rated at 10,000 lbs. trying to force it where it don't want to go.

You learn to study the tree and "read it" and going with the natural way the tree wants to fall and the proper cut it can be dropped EXACTLY where you want it.

PLEASE...... if you don't know what your doing get help from someone who does or hire a professional.
edit on 2-3-2014 by mwood because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 01:39 AM
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reply to post by WatchRider
 


Wow what a contrast between the two videos.

The guy in the second vid demonstrates skill and control. Notice how he is able to safely fall the tree exactly where he intends it to go.

The guy in the first video just starts haphazardly gnawing at the tree with a dull saw. He even manages to cut all the way through, leaving no hinge to control the fall. At that point, the tree can go anywhere the breeze nudges it. In the end, the tree comes back on him and falls in the exact opposite direction of the face cut... and hangs up in another tree to boot.

Its a shame that it didn't crush his saw, because he doesn't appear to be competent enough to use it safely.

Edit to add:
Chainsaw Chaps are a must, they're cheap protection. Chainsaw wounds are pretty nasty.
Hard hat is a good idea too... especially if you are cutting dead trees. Those branches are dead too, and it doesn't take much to break them loose.
edit on 2-3-2014 by FlapdoodleStork because: to add



posted on Mar, 4 2014 @ 06:31 AM
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This tree is an ash tree Garth of the Hollow took on, it's a bit smaller but he tackles it with maverick gusto!





posted on Mar, 4 2014 @ 08:48 AM
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Personally, I wear heavy gloves, a hardhat, and safety goggles when I'm chainsawing, but maybe I'm just strange that way....

I also am a big fan of the wedge method. Takes more time, but WAY safer. A little basic physics knowledge is a plus too.




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