It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Ancient People Lived on Bering Strait for Millennia Before Traveling into North America

page: 1
14

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 11:22 AM
link   
Early Native Americans Lived on Bering Strait for Millennia Before Traveling into North America

New research has suggested that early Native Americans lived on the Bering Strait land bridge for millennia before traveling into North America.

According to NBC News, anthropologists have proposed a theory that states the early Native Americans settled in Beringia for at least 10,000 years. When the land bridge from Siberia to North America vanished, so did evidence of their time spent there.

Published in the journal Science, three researchers believe they have found new clues to the lost world of Beringia. From Bering Sea sediments, they found fossilized insects, plants and pollen that would suggest Beringia was one of the only Arctic shrub tundra areas, meaning it had wood available for fuel.

"A number of supporting pieces have fallen in place during the last decade,


I've always wondered about this possibility. The idea of people actually settling on the bridge made sense to me. They would have found a fairly nice location to live and hunt. The area in question would have been fairly inviting and wasn't in their view merely a 'Bridge' to pass from Siberia to North America as we perceive it today.

They could have had possible small fresh water lakes and much game to hunt. Who knows, maybe some day they'll find a submerged Stonehenge/megalithic submerged sites in the region.

To give you an idea of how it may have looked..




posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 11:27 AM
link   
Beringia. I studied up on that for a time. It doesnt explain the diversity of language. They did a huge study on native languages and those with written languages too, such as Bella Coola, all the way down to South America. And found relations to not just Mongolian, but also to Japanese and Korean, Chinese.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 11:30 AM
link   
I bet it looked more like Finland, not just grasslands. They have found evidence of forrest at the poles from past cycles. deciduous trees.

upload.wikimedia.org...

www.nbfindo.org...



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 11:32 AM
link   
Well, if you moved there from Siberia, it would be like moving to Texas from Michigan. The Japanese trade winds do hit that area a little, and things may have been even better when they were there. I know Juneau is a lot nicer than here in the U.P. Get away from the coast and you freeze.

Not all the Indians ancestors got to America that way, some probably came from down South...across the ocean on ships long ago.

I don't know why they can't say there was a possibility of sailing ships long ago...Maybe the evidence is all rotted away but that doesn't mean it was not possible. It just means that so far they have not found evidence.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 11:34 AM
link   
reply to post by Unity_99
 


Hey thanks, Great addition, I was going by the description given in the article of arctic scrub land. I'm sure it would have been preferable to the ice and snow. Not to mention possibly great fishing along the coast.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 11:45 AM
link   
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Isn't this news just logical? If people of that time had no Concept of North America or different continents, it only makes sense that they would settle it just like any other land and not just think of it as a soon to be submerged bridge.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 11:54 AM
link   
reply to post by rickymouse
 


manifest destiny. its very well known in most circles that columbus was FAR from first. thousands of years of trips before that.

BUT the official story has to be that columbus sailed the ocean blue and found a new HOME to fight for. the people who sign up for the military and want to spread the gospel of the whiteman need a reason to do so or we dont win. we've learned this over many empires that have risen and fallen. the world doesn't want us to take them over and we dont wanna take over the world (deep down inside) so we need to delude soldiers into thinking they are fighting for good reasons.

the catastrophe of 535-536 i believe aided in this alot. helped "Reset" so to say the worlds pool of info. thats when the church arrested control of information and technology and started building the world we know today.

I've always wondered how we go from building massive pyramids all over the world to thinking the world is flat 1000 years ago? a big ass catastrophe that kills 75% plus of the worlds population would probably start us on that road. just trying to survive day to day would pretty well get people to not worry about things like math and geography. 535-536 was the start of the great plague that lasted til 542 as well so 535-542 is 7 years of hell. gotta imagine.. without the internet and whatnot information would be very easy to control.

"What you need food? come read this book and sit in on our mass and we will give you some bread how bout that?"



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 11:58 AM
link   
What I never got is why they some of them stayed there, and are still living way out there even today.

"Hey man, my cousin walked that way for 3 days and it got warmer and there were more trees and animals! Wanna check it out?"

"Nah, I'm good right here man ..."

I'm sorry, but living on the tundra is no fun. Mosquitoes are everywhere, it's marshy and wet, and wind in the winter time is brutal.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 12:04 PM
link   
Interesting perspective...
Fossils Offer Shed Light on Life on Land Bridge

Researchers have discovered how Native Americans may have survived the last Ice Age after splitting from their Asian relatives 25,000 years ago.

Academics at Royal Holloway, Univ. of London and the Universities of Colorado and Utah have analyzed fossils that revealed that the ancestors of Native Americans may have set up home in a region between Siberia and Alaska which contained woody plants that they could use to make fires. The discovery breaks new ground as until now no-one had any idea of where the Native Americans spent the next 10,000 years before they appeared in Alaska and the rest of the North America.

Prof. Scott Elias, from the Department of Geography at Royal Holloway says, “This work fills in a 10,000-year missing link in the story of the peopling of the New World.”



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 12:04 PM
link   
reply to post by MystikMushroom
 


i think at some point (Maybe even burned into our DNA) everyone has gone off to greener pastures to get burned by some bull # story. in ancient times if someone tried telling me it was warmer and greener on the other side of the mountains id probably think he was trying to take over whatever i currently had going on. no pictures to bring back to prove how good it is just the "Word" of others and we all know how well "Word" holds up 99% of the time.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 12:24 PM
link   
I'd like to think of it as a trade route. Some of our now biggest cities are where interstates meet. I would imagine that Beringia would have been a resting spot for traders coming and going from one side to the other. If you have fuel for fire, plentiful food, traders passing through, and fresh water, why leave?

My question is, why did technology move so slow back then? Look what we have accomplished in 2000 years. They lived there for 10,000 years and remained relatively un-evolved?



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 12:34 PM
link   
reply to post by mindseye1609
 


I see your point, but what about the people remembering that it was "colder back over there, where we came from"?

I mean, if it's better where they settled than where they came from, wouldn't it make sense that continuing the direction they were going would only lead to a more hospitable climate?

If you look at South American cultures, you can see how how much of an impact the climate has on the civilization.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 12:35 PM
link   
We have first hand knowledge how the earth can blow a warm breeze or turn it around and make it freeze .I was totally surprised when I first went to Prince Rupert and found a climate system that made no sense until I found out about the Japanese currents bringing the warm air across the Pacific .Who knows what the system worked like all those many years ago with the ocean much lower and a big chunk of ice in the northern hemisphere . Who knows ,maybe there were even less mosquitoes then as well ...I really cant see any reason for those things living on the earth ....



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 12:37 PM
link   
reply to post by Doodle19815
 


Well, when just meeting your basic survival needs takes all your energy -- you really don't have much time to sit around and invent new things. Living in the arctic (even then) would have been very tough. You'd spend almost all your time hunting, making warm clothes, preserving food, and eating food to stay warm. Every day would be a preparation for the next day.



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 12:46 PM
link   
reply to post by MystikMushroom
 


And I somewhat understand that. (Somewhat because we got to this point under the same circumstances.) I would be interested in seeing what sort of dwelling these people lived in. (Actually seeing evidence, not just what some guy thinks they lived in.) If they had wooden dwellings such as cabins, then their life would have been easier than say living in a tee-pee style home.

I would also be interested in finding out their diet. Fishing vrs. hunting. vrs. vegetation or farming. In my mind, living somewhere for 10,000 years, they would have had some farming going on. Hmmm.... hopefully this evening I will get to do some further research.

I like the idea mentioned above about possibly finding a megalith. How cool would that be?! (However unrealistic that might be.)



posted on Feb, 28 2014 @ 12:50 PM
link   

rickymouse
Well, if you moved there from Siberia, it would be like moving to Texas from Michigan. The Japanese trade winds do hit that area a little, and things may have been even better when they were there. I know Juneau is a lot nicer than here in the U.P. Get away from the coast and you freeze.

Not all the Indians ancestors got to America that way, some probably came from down South...across the ocean on ships long ago.

I don't know why they can't say there was a possibility of sailing ships long ago...Maybe the evidence is all rotted away but that doesn't mean it was not possible. It just means that so far they have not found evidence.







There is Archeological Evidence of a Marine Archaic Civilization that Sailed the Worlds Oceans over 12 Thousand Years ago . Some Theories support the contention that North and South America were first Populated by People arriving there by Ocean going Craft . There could have been Many Unknown Migrations from Europe and Asia to the Americas that are Still not known because their Coastal Settlements are now under water . Marine Archeology might oneday show Evidence of a Maritime People now Lost to History . Right Now , the best place to look for the remniants of them just might be on the Western Shores of North America somewhere near Alaska .



forgottenorigin.com...
edit on 28-2-2014 by Zanti Misfit because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 1 2014 @ 12:27 AM
link   
Interesting



posted on Mar, 2 2014 @ 03:38 PM
link   

----Thread Update----



Genetic and Paleoenvironmental Evidence

O’Rourke and colleagues point to a study of mitochondrial DNA – genetic information passed by mothers – sampled from Native Americans throughout the Americas. The study found that the unique genome or genetic blueprint of Native Americans arose sometime before 25,000 years ago but didn’t spread through the Americas until about 15,000 years ago.

“This result indicated that a substantial population existed somewhere, in isolation from the rest of Asia, while its genome differentiated from the parental Asian genome,” O’Rourke says. “The researchers suggested Beringia as the location for this isolated population, and suggested it existed there for several thousand years before members of the population migrated southward into the rest of North and, ultimately, South America as retreating glaciers provided routes for southern migration.”

“Several other genetic-genomic analyses of Native American populations have resulted in similar conclusions,” he adds.

“For a long time, many of us thought the land bridge was a uniform tundra-steppe environment” – a broad windswept grassland devoid of shrubs and trees, O’Rourke says. But in recent years, sediment cores drilled in the Bering Sea and along the Alaskan coast – the now-submerged lowlands of Beringia – found pollens of trees and shrubs



new topics

top topics



 
14

log in

join